Federalism

Federalism - Federalism POS2042 Outline I DualSovereignty A...

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Federalism POS 2042
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Outline I. Dual Sovereignty A. Interstate Commerce Clause B. Necessary and Proper Clause C. Supremacy Clause D. Tenth Amendment II. Dual Federalism (1789-1937) III. Modern Federalism (1937-present)
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Dual Sovereignty These were basically independent  nations coming together, so total  submission to a national government  was out of the question. Technically, the national government  and the state government were seen  as equals on most things, with clearly  separated powers. 
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Dual Sovereignty Up until about 1937, almost all real  regulatory laws and criminal justice  laws were in the hands of states. Federalism allows different states to  have different laws. There are four parts of the  constitution, however, that tip the  balance in favor of the federal  (national government):
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1. The Interstate commerce clause   “The Congress shall have Power To 
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course POS 2042 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at FIU.

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Federalism - Federalism POS2042 Outline I DualSovereignty A...

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