Unit 2 Project

Unit 2 Project - Mujica 1 Immortality on the Nile By Marco...

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Mujica 1 Immortality on the Nile By Marco Mujica IDH 1110, Valencia Community College Professor Noy Sparks 16 October 2006
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Mujica 2 Immortality on the Nile Religion has played a vital role in all major civilizations throughout history. Most of these religions give structure to their respective civilizations and help establish a comprehensive moral structure. Typically, adherence to these codes would grant a pleasant afterlife and ensured a type of immortality to their followers. Ancient Egyptians attempted to ensure their own immortality through the religious practices illustrated in their literature, paintings and architecture. In the manuscript The Dispute of a Man with His Soul (ca. 2050 – 1800 BCE), there are some religious guidelines and their relevance to the afterlife. In the 31 st and 32 nd tablets of The Book of the Dead (c. 1250 BCE), we see a depiction of the final judgment one would stand after death. Finally, a look at the structure of The Great Pyramid of Khufu in Giza (c. 2600 BCE) will show how pyramid architects ensured that their Pharaoh’s afterlife would not be disturbed. With a clear analysis of all three of these artifacts, one can build a perspective on how Ancient Egyptians sought immortality through their religious practices. The Dispute of a Man with His Soul is a glimpse into the workings of Egyptian religion. A man, having had enough of life’s turmoil and disappointments, has a dialogue with his soul, whom would rather live out its days than face the uncertainty of a poor man’s death. The man in the story, quite optimistic about the afterlife, says “If my soul will hearken to me, and its heart agrees with me, it will be happy. I will cause it to reach the West, like one who is in his pyramid,” (Matthews and Platt 22). In this passage, we see some guidelines start to form. First, the soul seems independent of the man. Second, it is important to the man that his soul travels with him to the West, the domain of the dead (Matthews and Platt 22). Lastly, pyramids seem important in getting to the West.
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Mujica 3 Another reference to pyramids comes up in the sixth paragraph in which the soul responds. “They who built in granite and fashioned pyramids – fine things of good work – when the builders have become gods, their offering tables are as empty as those of the wretches who die on the riverbank…,” (Matthews and Platt 22). In this quote, the soul makes it clear that pyramids, as well as offering tables, are only for the wealthy. This last quote shows the soul resigning to the man’s wishes. “Whether I remain here if you reject
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Unit 2 Project - Mujica 1 Immortality on the Nile By Marco...

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