Womankind

Womankind - Womankind by Marco Mujica IDH 2120, Valencia...

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Womankind by Marco Mujica IDH 2120, Valencia Community College Professor Dennis 16 Oct. 2007
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Mujica Womankind What kind of thinking went into the wording of the Declaration of Independence? When Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) wrote “all men are created equal,” how did he define “man?” This seemingly simple phrase has sparked heated debates for generations. Our founding fathers designed the Constitution to be a “living” thing; adaptable to the changes of time on society. Is it also possible that the Declaration of Independence was also designed in such a way? Even if it were not, social climates in the United States had drastic changes during the 19th century. People from all different walks of life were challenging these stubborn traditions in pursuit of a government that truly offered “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” Among these people were American women who did not share in the freedoms of their male counterparts. American women of the 19 th century helped broaden the concept of freedom for “all men” through their passionate writings and speeches. Two such women were Sojourner Truth (1797-1883 CE) and Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902 CE). Sojourner Truth’s Ain’t I a Woman speech (1851 CE) was a passionate speech that unified the issues of the unfair treatment of women and slaves by comparing herself to a man and to white women. Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s The Solitude of Self (1892 CE) showed how all beings need to be self- sufficient, whether they be men or women. Both women became figureheads of feminist freedom and helped broaden the concept of equality for “all men.” Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865 CE) has been debated as the greatest president of the United States. Even he, in his famous Gettysburg Address of 1863 CE, coined the phrase “all men are created equal” without any mention to women. The outdated tradition of excluding women from equal representation was becoming too great a 2
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Mujica problem. Women like Sojourner Truth were not taking this double standard anymore. Sojourner Truth was born in 1797 CE. Her exact date of birth is a mystery, as were most slaves’ birthdates (“Narrative”). She was originally named Isabella Baumfree under the charge of slavemaster Colonel Hurley Ardinburgh. He died when she was an infant and the Colonel’s son, Charles Ardinburgh, took charge. He was considered a kind master by his slaves. As Truth’s parents said to her once, “[our] lot was a fortunate one” (“Sojourner”). Charles Ardinburgh allowed the slaves to acquire small amount of land to
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course IDH 2 taught by Professor Frame during the Spring '07 term at Valencia.

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Womankind - Womankind by Marco Mujica IDH 2120, Valencia...

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