Classicism in Three Dimensions

Classicism in Three Dimensions - Mujica 1 Classicism in...

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Mujica 1 Classicism in Three Dimensions by Marco Mujica IDH 1111, Valencia Community College Professor Dennis 26 February, 2007
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Mujica 2 Classicism in Three Dimensions The term “Renaissance” literally translates to “rebirth.” The Italian Renaissance refers to a “rebirth” of classical Greek and Roman ideals that were resurfaced by scholarly, wealthy men. This rising middle class began to influence their cities by emphasizing ancient ideas and teachings. They formed their own universities, began to secularize religion and funded many fantastic works of art, including painting, music and sculpture. These rich individuals were responsible for a complete shift of priorities from Medieval thinking to these new Renaissance ideals; humanism, secularism, individualism, and classicism. Examples of these can be found behind almost every door in Renaissance Italy. Standing on the shoulders of ancient giants, huge advances were made in theology, philosophy, education and art. Antonio Pollaiuolo’s (c. 1432-1498 ACE) sculpture of Hercules and Anteus (c. 1475 ACE) is a prime example of classicism in the Renaissance period in Florence. The sculpture has several classical elements; its bronze material which was popular during Greek and Roman times, the use of the ancient hero Hercules and his battle with Anteus, and its figures’ perfect proportions, derived from the ancient sculptor Polyclitus’s teachings. By defining and breaking down each of the sculpture’s characteristics, connections to Renaissance classicism can be found. Antonio Pollaiuolo (c. 1432-1498 ACE) was born Antonio di Jacopo Benci in Florence, Italy (“Antonio” par. 1). He was a self-described goldsmith who also worked as an engraver, painter and sculptor. Antonio was a master of drawing. He was in fact known throughout his life as a maestro de disegno , or “master of drawing,” (Boorsch par. 1). Eventhough his younger brother Piero was also an accomplished artist (his preferred
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Mujica 3 medium was painting), Antonio was regarded as the genius of the two, (“Antonio” par. 1). Together, they opened a workshop circa 1457 AC where he designed and created productions for all artistic mediums, (par. 1). What set Antonio Pollaiuolo apart from many of his artistic rivals is his “introduction of a more accurate description of human anatomy, a new intensity of anatomical movement, and a new breath and naturalism in the rendition of landscape,” (par. 1). His figures were also “…the first in the history of art since antiquity to look as if they might have been based on a solid knowledge of anatomy, and were surely important stimulants for further anatomical exploration and study,” (par. 2). He completed several contracts for the Medici, a family of exceedingly wealthy Florentine bankers. One such contract was for the sculpture Hercules and Anteus
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course IDH 3 taught by Professor Frame during the Fall '07 term at Valencia.

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Classicism in Three Dimensions - Mujica 1 Classicism in...

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