03.04.conscientious+omnivory+2

03.04.conscientious+omnivory+2 - E ATING RIGHT: THE ETHICS...

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EATING RIGHT: THE ETHICS OF FOOD CHOICES AND FOOD POLICY March 4, 2011 Arguments for Conscientious Omnivory Continued
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Plan for Today: Admin stuff Finish Hare Scruton & Cohen against animal rights
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Admin Stuff: Posters Fnish next week Extra credits due tonight
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Admin Stuff: Paper drafts due 4 weeks after poster presentation. (So week of March 30 or week of April 6.)
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Admin Stuff: Paper drafts should aim to be about 6 (double-spaced) pages. In the usual case, you’ll be arguing for some moral conclusion (about what we ought to eat, or what policies we ought to implement) on the basis of what you researched for your poster.
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Admin Stuff: If you want to write your paper about some topic other than what your poster was on, that’s Fne, but you must clear your new topic with your TA.
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Admin Stuff: Lots of guidance on paper-writing in Sakai resources. (Under “Writing Guides and Model Answers”.)
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Micro-Quiz
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When Carl Cohen (in the reading for today) asks, “Do Animals Have Rights?”, the answer that he gives is, “yes”. A) True B) False
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Hare: Demi- Vegetarianism Review The Demi-Veg policy: E at a limited amounts of meat from humanely- raised animals.
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Demi-vegetarianism: Questions Why is it morally permissible to humanely raise animals and kill them for their meat? Why is demi-veg morally better than eating meat from factory-farmed animals? Why is demi-veg morally better than being vegetarian? Why is eating a limited amount of humanely- raised meat morally better than eating a lot of humanely-raised meat? Questions that come up for demi-veg advocates.
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Demi-vegetarianism: Questions Why is it morally permissible to humanely raise animals and kill them for their meat? Why is demi-veg morally better than eating meat from factory-farmed animals? Why is demi-veg morally better than being vegetarian? Why is eating a limited amount of humanely- raised meat morally better than eating a lot of humanely-raised meat? Need to answer this to head off vegetarianism. Hare ʼ s answer (short version): On utilitarian grounds, it ʼ s better for the animals to live, and have decent lives, and then be humanely slaughtered, than for them never to live at all. And without the demand for meat, they ʼ d never live at all.
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Demi-vegetarianism: Questions Why is it morally permissible to humanely raise animals and kill them for their meat? Why is that morally better than eating meat from factory-farmed animals? Why is that morally better than being vegetarian? Why is eating a limited amount of humanely- raised meat morally better than eating a lot of humanely-raised meat? To head off eat-everythingism. Hare ʼ s answer: (a) The lives of animals raised on factory farms are so bad, that it ʼ s better for them never to live at all than to live their lives of suffering before being slaughtered and eaten. (b) If we eat humanely raised meat, we exert economic inFuence toward
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This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 252 taught by Professor Egan during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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03.04.conscientious+omnivory+2 - E ATING RIGHT: THE ETHICS...

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