paper+assignment.252.food.2011.03.08

Paper assignment.252 - Argumentative Paper Assignment Philosophy 252 Based on what you discovered in your research for your

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Unformatted text preview: Argumentative Paper Assignment Philosophy 252 Based on what you discovered in your research for your poster, argue for some moral conclusion about the foods you researched. For example, if you researched foods A and B, you could argue that: It's morally permissible to eat A, but not B. It's morally impermissible to eat either A or B. It's morally permissible to eat either A or B. There are moral reasons to eat A rather than B, but those reasons aren't decisive in every case. It's morally permissible to produce A, but not B. As a society, we ought to legally prohibit the production of A but allow the production of B. As a society, we ought to subsidize the production of A, but not the production of B. As a society, we ought to tax the production of A, but not the production of B. As a society, we ought to enforce labeling requirements so that consumers can tell if a product is of type A or type B. Etc. Make sure that you: • Make it very clear just what the conclusion is that you're arguing for. • Have an argument for your conclusion, which you state as clearly and explicitly as possible. • Present what you take to be the best objection(s) to your argument, as clearly and explicitly as possible. • Present what you take to be the best response to the objection(s), as clearly and explicitly as possible. • Say how you think things stand with the argument at the end of the day. How confident are you that the argument succeeds? If you're not super confident, how come? What are your lingering concerns, if any? In this paper, you do not need to: • Look at every argument that could be offered for your conclusion, or every objection that could be made to your argument, or every response that could be made to the objection(s) you examine. It's better to pick a single, coherent line of argument and pursue that carefully than to half ­explain a whole bunch of different lines of argument. • Pretend that your arguments are stronger than they are, or support stronger conclusions than they actually do. It's fine to offer an argument for a fairly modest conclusion, and it's fine to have, and to express, doubts about whether your argument will wind up succeeding. Some logistical and administrative stuff: • Paper drafts are due 4 weeks after your poster presentation. (So March 30, April 1, April 6, or April 8, depending on when you presented your poster.) • You’ll get comments back on your draft on (or before) April 15. • Final versions of papers are due Monday May 2 (the last day of spring semester classes). • If you would much rather write your paper about something other than your poster topic, that's okay, as long as you clear it with your TA first. Let them know what else you're interested in writing about, and you can figure out a specific topic. • A good target length for first drafts of papers is about five double ­spaced pages. A good target length for final versions is about seven double ­spaced pages. ...
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This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 252 taught by Professor Egan during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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