The Arrival of Africans and the Descent into

The Arrival of Africans and the Descent into - cheap labor...

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The Arrival of Africans and the  The Arrival of Africans and the  Descent into Slavery Descent into Slavery Audrey Smedley –  Race in North America: Origin and  Evolution of a Worldview 1
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An African presence in America prior to  Christopher Columbus’ encounter with  Native Americans African and European trade relations The arrival of 20 Africans as indentured  servants to Jamestown, VA in 1619.  2
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By 1640 there were a large number of slaves in the  West Indies working on sugar plantations. The distinction between “indentured servant” and  “slave” was not clear until the late 17 th  century when  social and economic factors came into play. Earliest documented change of status to “slave” in  1640.  Why? 3
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Chicken or egg question…  Which came first, slavery or  racism? 4
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The growth of the tobacco industry prompted  the English to try several strategies to secure a 
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Unformatted text preview: cheap labor force Native Americans Poor English and Irish as indentured servants Africans 5 Bacon’s Rebellion of 1676 ◦ A unified class-based uprising ◦ Scared the ruling class ◦ More social control over laborers ◦ Beginnings of “whiteness” as an identity 6 For discussion: It can be argued that the remnants of Bacon’s Rebellion can be seen today. How so? 7 Conclusion Slavery first developed as an economic institution based on ruling class interests. Slavery also became a social institution that reinforced the growth of an elite class as well as the creation of “white” as a social idea that conferred power and dominance over “non-whites.” This created the greatest amount of resistance then and would continue to for centuries to come. 8...
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course HISTORY 101 taught by Professor Hives during the Fall '07 term at Temple.

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The Arrival of Africans and the Descent into - cheap labor...

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