Lipsitz - Race Class Youth

Lipsitz - Race Class Youth - uth Music th Cui Edited by...

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th Cui uth Music Edited by Andrew Ross "t;:)Jht, lricia Rose VYI )' I... _j 1 /y.!f / Routledge New York & london
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Published in 1994 by Routledge 29 West 35 Street New York, NY 10001 Published in Great Britain by Routledge 11 New Fetter Lane London EC4P 4EE Copyright © 1994 by Routledge Printed in the United States of America on acid-free paper. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be printed or reproduced or utilized in any form or by any elec- tronic, mechanical or other means, now known or hereafter invented, including photocopying and recording, or in any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Microphone fiends: youth music and youth culture / edited by Andrew Ross and Tricia Rose. p. em. Essays and interviews. The essays originated in a conference held at Princeton University, Nov. 1992, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the American Studies Program. ISBN 0-415-90907-4 (HB)-ISBN 0-415-90908-2 (pm 1. Music and youth. 2. Music and society. 3. Popular culture. 4. Rock music-History and criticism. I. Ross, Andrew, II. Rose, Triola. ML3795_M5 1994 306.4'84-dc20 93-44005 CIP British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data. Microphone Fiends: Youth Music and Youth Culture l. Ross. Andrew II. Rose. Tricia 306.4 ISBN 0-415-90907-4 (HB) ISBN 0-415-90908-2 (PB)
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We Know What Time it is Race, Class and Youth Culture in the Nineties George Lipsitz In Public Enemy's music video" Fight the Power," Flavor Flav, the group's free-spirited trickster, displays a stopped alarm clock pinned to his shirt and expiains that "this means we know what time it is." He does not elaborate on how the broken clock conveys this information, but from the context of the video his meaning is clear. The group believes that time has stopped, that progress is not being made, that the need for social change is so urgent that it obscures everything else about our time. Public Enemy's sense of urgency about the present contains an important lesson for investigations into youth music and youth culture. Our time is a time of crisis for youth, a time of unprecedented damage and danger to young people. Since the 1970s, deindustrial- ization, economic restructuring and a resurgence of racism have created fundamentally new realities for young people. Yet too often we talk about "youth" as a transhistorical and timeless entity. We use categories borrowed from other eras, without realizing how little relevance they hold for the new realities of the 1990s. Contemporary discussions of youth culture seem particularly plagued by memories of the 1960s-as if nothing significant has happened over the past twenty years. To be sure, the 1960s deserve recognition as a decade when young people active in the civil rights movement, in student protest groups, in antiwar activity, and in the emergence ofwomen's liberation took history into their own hands and provoked substantive changes in society at large. But the enduring hold of the 1960s on the imagination of the present has been pernicious.
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course EDUCATION 101 taught by Professor Leajacobson during the Spring '10 term at Temple.

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Lipsitz - Race Class Youth - uth Music th Cui Edited by...

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