11GI_End_Year_Summary

11GI_End_Year_Summary - 1 GI PHYSIOLOGY April Apperson,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Right hepatic duct Common hepatic duct Cystic duct Sphincter of Oddi releases pancreatic juice & bile into duodenum Pancreatic duct carries pancreatic juice containing enzymes & monitor peptide secreted by acinar cells from pancreatic acini into the duodenum = exocrine pancreas Gall bladder Common bile duct Left hepatic duct Liver GI PHYSIOLOGY April Apperson, UCSD OESS I. The primary GI functions are 1) digestion and absorption 2) host defense against ingested pathogens and 3) excretion of fat-soluble and indigestible wastes, which require complex coordination of: GI secretions and •complex motility patterns. A. Anatomy: the GI system includes the GI tract and accessory glands and ducts: •GI tract extends from the mouth to the anus and includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon. •Salivary glands are needed to prepare the food for swallowing. •The stomach prepares the food for digestion. •The exocrine pancreas and liver provide the enzymes and bile acids needed for digestion in the small intestine. •Bile is stored in the gall bladder and carried by the biliary ducts. •Pancreatic ducts carry pancreatic juice. Spleen Stomach Pyloric sphincter Duodenum Ileum Jejunum Colon Internal & external anal sphincters Rectum UES Ileocecal valve Pancreas Pharynx LES
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2
Background image of page 2
3 II. Fundamentals of regulation of GI function: GI secretions, enteric nervous system and GI muscle motility. A. Four GI secretions important in digestion and absorption of nutrients, host defense & protection of epithelia (C = cholesterol, FSV = fat-soluble vitamins, LCFA = long chain fatty acids, IF = intrinsic factor) : Saliva Gastric juice Pancreatic juice Bile Digestive enzymes lingual lipase α -amylase gastric lipase & pepsin from chief cells all pancreatic enzymes from acinar cells Absorptive factors IF for B12 absorption from parietal cells bile acids for vitamins ADEK & cholesterol & 50% of LCFA Host defense lysozyme, IgA, Defensins HCl from parietal cells Mucosal protection Mucin, growth factors trefoil peptides, mucin, HCO 3 from mucus HCO 3 via pancreatic duct from ductal cells HCO 3 - via biliary ducts from ductal cells Characteristics 1 – 1.5 L/day, hypotonic, slightly alkaline 2.5 L/day, isotonic, very acidic 0.5 L/day, isotonic, neutral to alkaline 1.5 L/day, isotonic, pH = 6.8 in gall bladder, neutral to slightly alkaline delivered to intestine Required for: Normal speech, swallowing, Not required C, FSV 50% LCFA absorption; BR excretion protection from acid B. Intestinal wall and enteric nervous system structure. 1. A section of small intestine wall is shown below, showing the four major regions (mucosa, submucosa, muscle layers and serosa) and the important structures in each. a. Mucosal epithelial cells bound to their basal lamina absorb nutrients and water.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course PHARM gs taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at UCSD.

Page1 / 12

11GI_End_Year_Summary - 1 GI PHYSIOLOGY April Apperson,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online