Paper 2 Drama.docx - Kara Bennett Professor Helmers English 200 Despite their differences both plays are fascinated(even obsessed by the ways in which

Paper 2 Drama.docx - Kara Bennett Professor Helmers English...

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Kara Bennett Professor Helmers English 200 June 14, 2020 Despite their differences, both plays are fascinated (even obsessed) by the ways in which the past impinges on the present. How are Wilson and Stoppard different in this regard? What also makes them similar? The play books, Fences written by August Wilson and A rcadia written by Tom Stoppard are very different in retrospect to theme. Fences is a very serious dramatic play involving race, love, responsibility, and love. Whereas, Arcadia is a comedic drama involving knowledge, intelligence, and love. These two plays are similar in the way the past affects the present of each of the people and theme of stories that are portrayed in Fences and Arcadia. Time affects the characters in these stories in more ways than one, involving race, love, responsibility, and intelligence. In the playbook, Fences it is told in the present tense, which Wilson uses the present tense of the story to reflect back on the past. The past is told through memories of the characters in the story, specifically Troy and Rose. Troy Maxson is used as the main time vessel in this story, as he is the main male protagonist and Troy’s memories and experiences shape the present story and those who are involved with him. A lot of the past memories Troy tells are ones that are not good memories, memories that are lessons that he can implement into his son or explain to his friend of his wife why he does things the way he does and why he instilled responsibility into his life and into his sons life. The author of Fences, August Wilson, uses Troy’s memories and experiences as a vessel to explain the past and metaphors of his experiences. He uses Troy, the main protagonist, to
explain the social norms and bias at time, as well as the historical accuracy and the racial issues that were happening at the time of Troy’s young life, into his adulthood while raising a family. “But . . . you born with two strikes on you before you come to the plate. You got to guard it closely. always looking for the curve ball on the inside corner. You can't afford to let none get past you. You can't afford a call strike. If you going down. . . you going down swinging.

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