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Hispanic Diversity - Running head HISPANIC DIVERSITY 1...

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Running head: HISPANIC DIVERSITY 1 Hispanic Diversity Veronica A Gonzales ETH 125 August 14, 2011 Jenna Schulte
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HISPANIC DIVERSITY 2 Hispanic Diversity In this research paper, I will be discussing the linguistic, political, social, economic, religious, and familiar aspects of four Hispanic groups living within the United States, those four being Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Hondurans. Usually when people think of Hispanics or Latinos, they tend to believe that they are all the same because of the language they speak, which is Spanish. But this is untrue. Each group has their own cultural values, which is what I will speak about in this paper. In the United States, Spanish is the second most used language in the United States, and it is used by all of these Hispanic groups. According to Wikipedia, there are 45 million Hispanics who speak Spanish in the United States. And as of July 2009, Mexican Americans make up approximately 10% of the population of the US (Wikipedia, 12 A). In the United States, Mexican Americans generally speak either Spanish, English, or both. Although Puerto Rico is a United States territory, the primary language there is still Spanish, and so many of the Puerto Ricans who come to the United State speak Spanish as well. Although the inhabitants of Puerto Rico have been United States citizens since 1917, only one third of the country speaks English (ELPAC - English Language Political Action Committee, n.d.). The national language of Cuba is Spanish, and most Cuban Americans are able to speak the language. "In 1989 and 1990, among Cuban Americans born in the United States, 96 percent said that they could speak either Spanish and English equally well or English better than Spanish (Buffington, n.d.)” Honduran Americans are no different in that they are also speakers of both Spanish and English.
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