19 JIT & Lean Opeartions

19 JIT & Lean Opeartions - Lesson 19 Just-In-Time...

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19 - 1 repetitive production system in which processing and movement of materials and goods occur just as they are needed, usually in small batches developed by Taiichi Ohno at Toyota Lesson 19 Just-In-Time and Lean Systems
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19 - 2 . Management philosophy (produce only what is needed when it is needed) . Pull system What Is JIT What Is JIT JIT is a manufacturing philosophy involving an integrated set of procedures/activities designed to achieve a high volume of production using minimal inventories (raw materials, Raw materials, parts & sub assemblies are pulled through the manufacturing process when they are needed. Simply put, JIT is a philosophy of “make what is needed … when it is needed”.
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19 - 3 Product Design Process Design Personnel Elements Manufacturing Planning Eliminate disruptions Make the system flexible Eliminate waste A balanced rapid flow Ultimate Goal Supporting Goals Building Blocks What Is JIT
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19 - 4 JIT Repetitive production Minimal shop floor control Simpler Relies on visual or audible signals to trigger production and inventory (e.g. auto carpets) Lower inventories related to need “at the time” MRP Lot size or batch production Extensive shop floor control More complex Relies on computer system to trigger production and order inventory Inventories related to batch or lot sizes Comparison Of JIT & MRP
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19 - 5 What JIT Does . Attacks waste . Exposes problems & bottlenecks . Achieves streamlined production What JIT Does Eliminate disruptions in production … caused by poor quality, equipment breakdowns, schedule changes, late deliveries Makes the manufacturing delivery system flexible or more robust … allowing it to handle a variety of products and changes in the level of output while still maintaining balance and throughput speed. Reduces setup and delivery times Eliminates waste
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19 - 6 Waste includes any operation, movement, inventory, processing, reporting, etc. which does not add value to the resulting product. Areas of waste include, but are not limited to: . Overproduction . Processing waste . Waiting time . Inefficient work methods . Excess Inventory . Unnecessary movement . Product defects … rework . Setup time . Excess motion . Machine breakdown Waste
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19 - 7 Strategies For Minimizing Waste We have already discussed many strategies for minimizing waste. Some of these include: Focused Factories Assembly Lathe Lathe Mill Mill Mill Mill Drill Drill Drill Heat Heat Heat Grind Grind Grind Grind Cellular Layouts Group Technology Layouts
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19 - 8 Considerations in Job Design aimed at improving worker productivity and skill levels. Specialization Multi-functional workers Behavioral Approaches to Job Design Teams Methods Analysis Motion Study Working conditions Incentive pay plans Strategies For Eliminating Waste
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19 - 9 Average cycle inventory Lot size = 100 On-hand inventory 5 10 15 20 25 30 Time (hours) 100 – 75 – 0 – Lot size = 50 50 – 25 – Strategies For Eliminating Waste Manufacturing in smaller lot sizes reduces excess inventory
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19 - 10 Work in process queues (banks) Change orders Engineering design redundancies
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19 JIT & Lean Opeartions - Lesson 19 Just-In-Time...

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