Labs 14 & 15

Labs 14 & 15 - Lab 14: Thunderstorms and Tornadoes...

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Lab 14: Thunderstorms and Tornadoes 1. a. LZK 650 mb b. FWD 725 mb c. DTX 525 mb 2. a. LZK -2ºC b. FWD 4ºC c. DTX -10ºC 3. a. LZK -2°C b. FWD 4°C c. DTX -11°C 4. a. LZK -10°C = (since this neither is <or >-10°C but =-10°C, would it be both or a mixture of liquid and ice crystals, since it does not state or -10°C) liquid b. FWD 5°C = liquid c. DTX -15°C = ice crystals 5. a. It is winter in Little Rock, Arkansas (LZK) when this sounding was recorded. Varying degrees of melting will occur because the wet-bulb temperature is 2°C which is between 1°C and 3°C. b. It is winter in Fort Worth, Texas (FWD) when this sounding was recorded. In the winter season precipitation typically generates from ice crystals within a cloud where the wet-bulb temperature is between -10°C to -15°C and they will melt if they encounter a sufficiently deep layer of air with temperatures are warmer than 0°C. Here the temperature at the highest saturated level is 4°C so these crystals are likely to melt at this temperature. The wet-bulb temperature of 5°C at this warm layer and is greater than 3°C , therefore, ice crystal will melt and likely not refreeze before hitting the surface but since the surface layer temperature is subfreezing, is <0°C, than the liquid drop may freeze on impact with a frozen surface which is called freezing rain. c. It is winter in Detroit, Michigan (DTX) when this sounding was recorded. In the winter season precipitation typically generates from ice crystals within a cloud where the wet-bulb temperature is between -10°C to -15°C and they will melt if they encounter a sufficiently deep layer of air with temperatures are warmer than 0°C. The wet-bulb temperature is -11°C here so the ice crystals will have very little melting which means the descending ice crystals will be passing through a sufficient enough cold for any liquid drops to refreeze before impact with the surface as sleet or even ice pellets. 6. 850 mb T in Celsius, Precipitation Type, Agreement Y/N
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a. LZK -3.5 C, snow, N b. FWD 3.8 C, liquid precipitation, N c. DTX -5.7 C, snow, Y 7. a.
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This note was uploaded on 09/10/2011 for the course GO 101 taught by Professor Loving during the Spring '10 term at Park.

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Labs 14 &amp; 15 - Lab 14: Thunderstorms and Tornadoes...

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