03.11.mark+robson+lecture

03.11.mark+robson+lecture - Eating Right: The Ethics of...

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Unformatted text preview: Eating Right: The Ethics of Food Choices and Food Policy Global Food Production: People, Public Health, and Controlling Pests Mark Gregory Robson, PhD, MPH, DrPH Professor 2 3 4 5 Global Food Production: People, Public Health, and Controlling Pests The Plan for this afternoon: A quick look at some interesting menus, Food and environment-how they connect, Food production systems globally-some of the challenges and risks, Programs to improve production and the health of the producers, Other risks to rural populations, and Food issues as they relate to natural disasters. 6 7 Population Without Access to Safe Water 8 Global Life Expectancy Making the case: 9 Making the case: Many countries around the world, especially in Africa and South America, are considered developing countries. It is estimated that 80 percent of the worlds population live in the developing countries. But MORE THAN 80 percent of the worlds occupational and environmental health problems occur in these countries. Examples: silicosis, lead poisoning, benzene poisoning. What is happening in the developing countries, as far as occupational and environmental risks, is what was happening in the currently developed countries 50 years ago. 10 To still have hunger in our world of abundance is not only unacceptable, it is unforgivable.---- Ronald Cantrell - IRRI World hunger is a complex issue, one for which there is no one answer. Yet while biotechnology may not be the only solution, it can be a valuable tool in a struggle to feed a hungry world....
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This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 252 taught by Professor Egan during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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03.11.mark+robson+lecture - Eating Right: The Ethics of...

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