Intelligence_FA10 - The Psychology of Intelligence and its...

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The Psychology of Intelligence and its educational relationship to teaching and learning goals. Weekly Secret: Effective teachers and parents have a functional understanding of the idea of intelligence and of the developmental nature of intellectual growth. Objective State an operational definition of intelligence, defining the significant features that afford you the opportunity to use that understanding to facilitate the instruction of children.
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A teacher’s (or parents’) understanding of the concept of intelligence impacts the delivery of instruction and the expectation of achievement . Therefore, it is incumbent on all educators and parents to determine their implicit theory of intelligence. A great deal of reflective thinking about this matter is required to achieve a robust and empowering understanding. Introduction A Demonstration of Lenses Implicit thinking implies that we bring preconceptions to the formal study of intelligence Such beliefs bias us in favor of theories that match our own notions and sensitivities Explicit thinking suggests that others have systematized efforts to investigate intelligence Biological Perspective Developmental Perspective Cognitive Perspective Empirical Perspective Cultural Perspective Multiple Perspective Explicit Views:
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Topics of Discussion Toward A Definition History of the Concept Variable Perspectives Relationship to teaching and learning An alternative understanding INTELLIGENCE is: the capacity to learn the ability to adapt successfully to new situations the ability to acquire and use knowledge of various type and complexities the ability use and manipulate abstractions and symbol system INTELLIGENCE is: the ability to solve problems the ability to create problems to be solved the capacity of contributing to one’s culture the total amount of knowledge and acuity of mental functioning what IQ Tests measure
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INTELLIGENCE is: ZOLA’S ambiguous DEFINITION People vary in intelligence. The concept involves three broad themes: aptitude or capacity, knowledge or acquired facts and skills, and problem solving strategies. The TEST 1905 Binet develops method of identifying subnormal school children 1911 Binet introduces the concept of mental age 1914 Stern suggests a mental quotient 1915 American schools offer NO standardized tests 1916 Terman translates test for American children 1917 Yerkes develops the ARMY ALPHA The TEST The first intelligence tests were devised to measure probability of school success Intelligence test are NOT good predictors of job success, marital happiness, or life fulfillment Intelligence tests measure only a sample of school-like behaviors IQ scores can change with experience and training
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This note was uploaded on 09/11/2011 for the course EPSY 201 taught by Professor Davidzola during the Fall '10 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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Intelligence_FA10 - The Psychology of Intelligence and its...

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