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reagents lab - Taarika George Partners Casey Watrous...

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Taarika George Partners: Casey Watrous, Rebecca Willett and Allie Fitzpatrick Due 10/4/04 Period F Finding Compounds In Everyday Foods INTRODUCTION - The body needs certain compounds to grow and for energy. They are: carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and other nutrients. These compounds are obtained when plants and animals are eaten as food. In this experiment, tests for specific compounds will be performed and those tests will be used to determine which compounds are found in regular foods. If foods are tested for certain compounds, then the plant based foods will show presence of carbohydrates and vitamins and the animal based foods will show presence of proteins and fats because animals are able to store energy as fat, where as plants convert nutrients from the soil into useful vitamins. METHOD - 1. Prepare a table similar to the attached table (1). 2. Reagents are chemical solutions that scientists use to detect the presence of certain compounds. Observe the six reagent tests the teacher performs. In the table, describe the results of each test. 3. Prepare another table similar to the attached table (2). Record the presence (+) or absence (-) of each chemical substance in the foods you test. 4. Predict the substances you will find in each sample the teacher assigns to you. Then test the samples as the teacher demonstrated or as described in steps 5-10. Record the result of each test in your logbook, using a + or -. 5. Protein test: Place 5 mL of assigned food in a test tube. Add 10 drops of Biuret solution. 6. Glucose test: Add 3 mL of Benedict’s solution to 5 mL of assigned food. Place the test tube in a beaker of boiling water, and heat for 5 minutes. 7. Starch test: Add 5 drops of Lugol’s iodine solution to 5 mL of assigned food. 8. Vitamin C test: Add 8 drops of indophenol to 5 mL of assigned food. 9. Chloride test: Add 5 drops of silver nitrate solution to 5 mL of assigned food. 10. Fat test: Rub the assigned food on a piece of brown wrapping paper. Hold the paper up to the light. When food contains only a small amount of fat, the fat may not be detected by this method. If no fat has been detected, place the assigned food in 10 mL of fat solvent such as isopropyl alcohol. Allow the food to dissolve in the solvent for about 5 minutes. Pour the solvent on brown paper. The spot
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