23.AnimalDiversityPart1 - 23 Animal Origins and Diversity...

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Animal Origins and Diversity 23
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What percentage of known species do animals represent? There are about 1.7 million described species of living organisms. About what percentage of these are animals? A. 1% B. 10% C. 25% D. 50% E. 75%
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What percentage of known animals do insects represent? There are about 1.3 million described species of animals. About what percentage of these are insects? A. 1% B. 10% C. 25% D. 50% E. 75%
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There are more species of described insects than of all other life
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How do you recognize an animal? General characteristics of animals (how you probably recognize an animal): • Multicellularity • Heterotrophy • Internal digestion • Motility But these are not diagnostic for animals, as many other species share them.
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Best evidence for animal monophyly is from genome sequencing
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Today: All the non-bilaterians (sponges, placozoans, ctenophores, and cnidarians)
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Thursday: Protostomes
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Next Tuesday: Deuterostomes
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Distinct Body Plans Evolved among the Animals The common ancestor of animals was probably a colonial flagellated protist; similar to existing colonial choanoflagellates and sponges. Cells in the colony began to specialize for different functions. Coordination among groups of cells may have been improved by regulatory molecules; eventually leading to larger, more complex animals.
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Choanocytes in Sponges Resemble Choanoflagellate Protists
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Choanocytes in Sponges Resemble Choanoflagellate Protists
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Animal Phylogeny: Diploblasty and triploblasty
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Distinct Body Plans Evolved among the Animals Developmental patterns Distinct layers of cells form in early development: Diploblastic animals have 2 cell layers— ectoderm and endoderm . Triploblastic have 3 cell layers—ecto-, endo-, and mesoderm
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What will this hole become?
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Animal Phylogeny: Protostomes and deuterostomes
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Gastrulation —hollow ball of cells indents and forms a cavity, the blastopore . Protostomes
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23.AnimalDiversityPart1 - 23 Animal Origins and Diversity...

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