Classics 150 Post Midterm Notes

Classics 150 Post - Lapchak 1 Classics 150 Notes Post-Midterm Thursday May 5 Tuesday May 10 Thursday May 12 The Stoic Stage Cicero the Philosopher

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Lapchak 1 Classics 150 Notes: Post-Midterm Thursday May 5 Tuesday May 10 Thursday May 12 The Stoic Stage Cicero the Philosopher Ÿ Education: Epicurean, Stoic, and Academic (Plato) - An immensely learned man - Highly trained in philosophy which he paid particular attention to in his leisure time, otium - Been trained in all the leading philosophical schools of his day - Believed in academic skepticism, that denied any realism that one could know everything ** PICTURE ** The Tomb of Archimedes ( Tusc. P. 86) Ÿ Later 50s Rhetorical and political theory - The Republic (“The Dream of Scipio”) Ÿ 46 - 44 Philosophical “encyclopedia” (plus more rhetorical theory) - 12 philosophical works - Tusculan Disputations (45 BC) Cicero’s Sorrows Ÿ Political eclipse - Exile 58-57 - Subservience to Pompey and Caesar - Civil War 49-45 - Mainly important to know that he lost in his efforts, personal obligation, joined Pompey’s side - Betrayed Caesar, whom he was once aligned with - Gave up the struggle when the war came to be decided, as others continued - Disliked and distrusted by both sides, because he was once trusted by Caesar, but joined Pompey’s side, then gave up on the effort when the outcome was already decided - Death of daughter Tullia, Feb. 45 - Intense personal loss of Cicero - Daughter died in his Tusculan villa, - Left Tuscula, then put himself away from all, off the beaten track The Tusculan Disputations = “Philosophical Discussions at Tusculum” - Cicero alludes clearly to the great emotional crisis, by which he had been overwhelmed Philosophy’s Promise Ÿ Philosophy as “therapy of reason:” pp. 53-54 - Philosophy’s greatest promise (p.63) “That … philosophy will ensure that the man who has obeyed its laws shall never fail to be armed against the hazards of fortune: that he shall possess and control, within his own self, every possible guarantee for a satisfactory and happy life.” - Appeal to philosophy is that it can give you some sort of security in this wild world - An escape from the enslavement to circumstance, chance, or fortune The Plan of the Discussions at Tusculum Ÿ 5 books: - I Death is not to be feared
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Lapchak 2 - II Pain is endurable - III How sorrow can be alleviated - IV Other “disturbances of the mind” - V Moral goodness ( virtus ) alone suffices for happiness ( beata vita ) Tusc., Book 5 Ÿ The good or “happy” life ( beata vita ) - Epicureans - pleasure and the virtues - pleasure and “the happy life” - Peripatetics (Aristotle, Theophrastus) - Bodily and external goods (health, wealth) as well as virtue - Stoics - Virtue alone suffices - “Happiness” on the rack Stoicism Made Simple Ÿ See pp. 26-27, 72-76, 88-91, 96 Ÿ Zeno (333-262 BC) - “the Stoa” (“Painted Portico” in Athens) - Held court here - Taught in Athens in the sense of having philosophical discussions Ÿ Universe is organized rationally and providentially - Logos (Reason) = “Mind of Zeus” = “God” = “Nature” - Stoics have always been amazed at how everything has an order, but that results in itself an interesting problem
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course CLASS 150 taught by Professor Morstein-marx during the Spring '11 term at UCSB.

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Classics 150 Post - Lapchak 1 Classics 150 Notes Post-Midterm Thursday May 5 Tuesday May 10 Thursday May 12 The Stoic Stage Cicero the Philosopher

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