envs 100 lecture 12

envs 100 lecture 12 - Bioinvasions as an ecological...

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Bioinvasions as an ecological phenomenon & a policy challenge ENVS 100 Thursday, October 21, 2010
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Overview How has our understanding of bioinvasions changed over time? How has our perception of bioinvasions as a phenomenon – and a policy issue – changed over time? What is bioinvasions policy, and what are the major policy challenges in dealing with bioinvasions?
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Ice plant
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Tamarisk - Native to Eurasia & Africa - Introduced as an erosion control & ornamental - Invaded most watercourses in the Southwest - Displaces native trees like cottonwood, willow, mesquite
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Yellow star thistle in Yosemite
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Asian longhorned beetle
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Chinese mitten crab (Eriocher sinensis)
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Eurasian zebra mussel ( Dreissena polymorpha )
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Ships’ Ballast Water
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Bioinvasions - Definition Species or other viable biological material that have been transported beyond its historic range (including, but not limited to transfer of organisms from one country to another), and which become established & form self- reproducing populations in the new environment Also interchangeably referred to as -n on-indigenous species - exotic species - alien species
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Lodge et al., 2006, Ecol. Applics
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Lodge et al., 2006, Ecol. Applics
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¾ Why are bioinvasins a conservation issue & a policy problem? What is it about bioinvasions that is problematic? What do we worry about?
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envs 100 lecture 12 - Bioinvasions as an ecological...

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