HC-Lecture02-The-Building-Process

HC-Lecture02-The-Building-Process - Heavy Construction...

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Heavy Construction Heavy Construction Lecture #02 Lecture #02 An Overview of the Building Process L Prieto-Portar 2008
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Multi-family residential construction. Montreal.
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Multi-family residential construction, Honolulu.
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Modular prefabrication of multi-family construction.
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Single-family residential construction.
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Modular pre-fabrication of jail cells: institutional construction.
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Modular pre-fabrication of jail cells as a finished product at Riker Island Prison, NY.
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Shopping malls as an example of commercial construction.
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ort construction is an example of heavy construction.
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The Building Process: From an Owner’s Need to Reality o Select the Design Professionals (Engineers and Architects) o Develop a Building Concept o Perform a Feasibility Study o Prepare the Design Contract Documents o Submit the Documents for Building Official’s Compliance Review o Bid and Select the Contractor o Select the Subcontractors and Material Suppliers o Begin Construction o Perform Compliance Inspections o Close out Construction. Operate and Maintain.
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Selection of Building Materials. o Suitability o Availability o Cost o Appearance o Preference o Building Constraints: - Physical Limitations - Available Land - Soil Bearing Capacity - Structural Span Limitations - Building Material Performance - Budget - Legal Restrictions, etc.
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Who has the primary responsibility for building material selection? Depends on the Contractual Arrangements: - Owner, architect and contractor (OAC), or - Design and build (DB), or - Design, build, operate, finance and maintain (DBOFM); but is often done by, - The Owner for continuity of appearance and/or performance, or - The Designer, with input from the Contractor, based on knowledge of costs, availability and constructability. NB: AIA 201 contract specifications states, “The contractor shall be solely responsible for and have control over means, methods, techniques, sequences and procedures and for coordinating all portions of the Work under the contract ( unless instructed otherwise ).”
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Zoning Ordinances Generally Imposed by Local Authorities (State, County, City, Town). Typically Govern: - Property Use and types of allowed activities (hotel, industrial, residential, commercial, institutional, military, etc.), - Size, Setbacks, Appearance (square footage, height, percent of the lot that is buildable, distances from the property lines, signage, lighting, landscaping, exterior appearance, etc.), - Access, Parking (street access, LOS, number of parking spaces, etc.), - Construction Activities (noise, working hours, etc.). Typically managed by the local “Planning Department”, and their Inspectors generally enforce compliance. Building Codes Their purpose: “… establish minimum construction standards for the protection of life, health, and welfare of the public.” Their primary intent is to protect against fire, wind, seismic events and other major hazards.
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Model Codes (standardized codes): Until recently, there were three “national” codes. Now, a fourth, the
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This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course CCE 4001 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at FIU.

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HC-Lecture02-The-Building-Process - Heavy Construction...

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