HC-Lecture05-Foundations-for-Buildings

HC-Lecture05-Foundations-for-Buildings - Heavy Construction...

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Unformatted text preview: Heavy Construction Heavy Construction Lecture #05 Lecture #05 Foundations for Buildings L Prieto-Portar 2008 Major Assemblies of a Building. super-structure sub-structure foundations Primary Factors Affecting the Choice of Foundation: 1) Subsurface soils: The building must be placed on a soil that can carry the new load. In other words, that soil must have adequate “bearing capacity”. Therefore, the placement of the foundations will be at a depth where the bearing capacity will hold the building with an adequate factor of safety (FS>4). 2) Ground water conditions: If the water table is high, and bearing capacity is below that water table, then the Engineer needs to determine if a deep foundation must be used (usually more expensive than a shallow foundations by a factor of 10), or if a deep basement could be built with an expensive retaining wall system. 3) Construction access, methods & site conditions: Working space available. 4) Environmental factors: Noise to neighbors, disposal of water and debris. 5) Building Codes & Regulations: Wind for Miami = 146 mph, seismic in SF, etc. 6) Impact on surrounding structures: Clearances, undermining, vibrations, etc. 7) Construction schedule and risks: Litigation from neighbors, risks, safety of jobsite, etc. Types of Foundations. Shallow foundations: individual or isolated footings, continuous footing (also called a wall footing) combined footings (combines two or more columns on one footing) pedestal footings (bring the column out of moist ground) mat (or raft) footings (for large buildings or poor soil conditions) Deep foundations: piles (hammered into the ground) shafts (placed, called “in-situ”) augered (screwed into the ground, reinforced and then grouted) Retaining walls: reinforced concrete walls mechanically stabilized earth walls (MSE) flexible sheet pile walls cantilevered anchored braced cuts cofferdams Shallow Footings. Requirements . Shallow footings are the most economical and easiest to build. They can be used when the upper layers of the soil have good bearing capacity. Even poor soils may be easily improved by compaction, grouting or other techniques to take advantage of the economy of shallow footings. Below are shallow footings on firm clay soils. A line of spread footings for perimeter (lightly loaded) columns. Preparing the reinforcing steel for a continuous or wall footing. A finished continuous footing with steel dowels to reinforce the CMU walls. A line of spread footings tied together with a continuous footing.A line of spread footings tied together with a continuous footing....
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This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course CCE 4001 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at FIU.

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HC-Lecture05-Foundations-for-Buildings - Heavy Construction...

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