HC-Lecture10-Interior-Finishes-of-Houses

HC-Lecture10-Interior-Finishes-of-Houses - Heavy...

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Heavy Construction Heavy Construction Lecture #10 Lecture #10 Interior Finishes L Prieto-Portar 2008
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Interior Construction Sequence. 1) Interior Partition Framing. Some may also be structural framing. 2) Rough-in. Includes MPE (mechanical, plumbing and electrical) equipment. 3) Code Compliance Inspection. This is done prior to covering the walls. 4) Place thermal insulation and vapor retarder. 5) Building Inspection. 6) Ceiling and wall covering materials. 7) Interior millwork and finishes for walls and floors. 8) Install MPE fixtures, devices, trim and appliances.
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WC rough-in Waste vent piping Pipe insulation Copper water piping (joints)
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PVC waste and supply piping
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PVC pipe with glued joints
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Cast iron piping (CIP) is typically used for high-rise commercial work
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Plumbing Chase Vent Pipe A “Stacked” plumbing system.
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Insulated “flex” duct
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Duct anchorage Sprinkler pipe (commercial bldg) Insulation Flexible duct
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Round AC duct
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Square AC ductwork
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Isolation pad Isolation joint
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Fire damper
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Fire damper
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Electrical rough-in Using ROMEX
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Electrical rough-in with Romex wire.
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Electrical rough-in with flexible conduits
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Block-in for hanging cabinets and other equipment.
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Block-in at kitchens.
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Nail protector. Protects against dry-wall screws puncturing the pipe.
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Nail protectors and sealant to prevent smoke migration
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Thermal Insulation. The purpose of thermal insulation is to retard the passage of heat through the walls, and provide the occupants with a higher level of comfort. Obviously, the insulation reduces the utility costs associated with both heating during the winter and cooling during the summer months. The most common materials are, (1) the batt or blanket (made of glass wool), which is placed between studs; (2) loose fill , made of glass or rock wool, blow into the spaces between studs; (3) rigid board , made from polystrene, which is applied over the framing. The effectiveness of the insulation is measured in its R-Values. The R-value is an indication of the material’s resistance to the flow of heat. The larger the R-value, the higher the resistance to heat flow. Minimum R-values are specified in all Codes. The R-value is a function of the thickness of the space available between the studs. As Codes increase the minimum R-values, the older 2”x 4” studs were insufficiently thick to provide space for thicker batts. That is the reason many modern houses are built with 2”x 6”.
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Outside wall Inside wall Vapor retarder with R=13.
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Vapor Retarders. The purpose of using a
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This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course CCE 4001 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at FIU.

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HC-Lecture10-Interior-Finishes-of-Houses - Heavy...

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