HC-Lecture17-Reinforced-Concrete

HC-Lecture17-Reinfor - Heavy Construction Heavy Lecture#17 Reinforced Concrete L Prieto-Portar 2008 Hoover Dam An example of cyclopic concrete

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Heavy Construction Heavy Construction Lecture #17 Lecture #17 Reinforced Concrete L Prieto-Portar 2008
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hoover Dam An example of cyclopic concrete
Background image of page 2
Concrete History. - 1824, Aspdin patented Portland Cement, named after the Portland limestone; - 1850s, reinforced concrete invented; - 1920s, pre-stressed concrete invented. Selecting a Building’s Structure: 1) Who are involved? - the Owner or, the Developer, - the Architect, - the Structural Engineer (the most important!), - the MEP Engineer, and the - the Contractor. 2) Major factors involved: a) Cost b) Typical bay sizes c) Expected lateral loads from wind and seismic d) Desired design flexibility e) Story heights (different for office versus residential, etc) f) Durability g) Aesthetics and exterior details.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Concrete Concrete is an imitation of nature’s sedimentary rocks: conglomerates and breccias. Portland cement is made from finely ground and baked limestones and dolomites. When water is added, the paste becomes a rock-like material. Its ingredients are, 1) Portland cement; 2) Course aggregate: usually occupies about 75% of the entire volume, and is the most important factor in the structural strength of the concrete. It must be clean, chemically stable and properly graded though sieves so that the different size particles interlock together. Their maximum size must fit between reinforcing bars, and so they are selected to be < than ¾ of the distance between bars. 3) Fine aggregate, mostly sand and silica fume. 4) Water, clean and essentially potable. 5) Admixtures (optional) for workability, etc.
Background image of page 4
Properties of Concrete. Concrete is very versatile (will form to any shape), pliable when mixed, strong, durable, will not rust (such as steel) or rot (such as wood), does not need to be coated and resists fire. Concrete is made from Portland Cement, which is a generic term for a manufactured stone that is a fine gray powder. When water is added, a chemical reaction takes place, and the cement acts like a “glue” or binder, that ties the mass of coarse and fine aggregates together. The chemical reaction is called “curing”, and is essentially a hydration. The different types of cement are: Type I - Normal (used for most applications); Type II and V - Moderate and high sulfate resistance, for corrosive environments; Type III - High early strength; Type IV - Low heat of hydration; Type 1A, IIA, IIIA - Air entrained cements. Cement uses are, Site-cast concrete, most commonly seen as building sites; Concrete block units (CMU), used for walls; Pre-cast concrete products, built in specialty manufacturing plants, and Mortars, used for masonry, water-proofing finishes, etc.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Type I - Normal
Background image of page 6
Type I - Normal
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Type III - High Early Strength
Background image of page 8
Type IV - Low Heat of Hydration
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Aggregates. Aggregates constitute about 75% of the volume of
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course CCE 4001 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at FIU.

Page1 / 81

HC-Lecture17-Reinfor - Heavy Construction Heavy Lecture#17 Reinforced Concrete L Prieto-Portar 2008 Hoover Dam An example of cyclopic concrete

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online