HC-Lecture31-Glazing

HC-Lecture31-Glazing - Heavy Construction Heavy...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Heavy Construction Heavy Construction Lecture #31 Lecture #31 Glazing L Prieto-Portar 2008 Glazing. The term glazing includes, besides the glass sheets, the insulating airspace, coatings, insect screens, weather-stripping, curtains, blinds, sashes, etc. Glass. Benefits of using glass: llows entry of natural light into building interiors,- Allows entry of natural light into building interiors,- Provides views of the exterior environment, and- The entry of sunlight provides warmth. Disadvantages and design constraints:- Limits the occupants privacy,- Lowers the resistance to thermal transmission: heat in the summer and cold in the winter, and- Higher initial and operating costs. A brief background of glass. Glass has been used for thousands of years (eg., Egyptians produced glass bottles around 3,500 BC). However, the manufacture of glass commenced around the 10th century AD, in two basic types: a) Crown glass , was heated and blown into a sphere, then reheated and spun on a punty (a rod). The sphere become a disk which was cooled and cut into pieces, and b) Cylinder glass , was heated and blown into sphere, then swung like a pendulum and elongated into a cylinder. The ends were cut off, then split lengthwise, reheated, opened, flattened into rectangular sheets, and finally, cut into pieces. Neither method produced high quality, or optical glass. c) The third type of glass was called plate glass when introduced in the 17th century. The process consisted of casting the molten glass into iron or wooden frames and then spreading the glass into sheets by iron rollers. After the sheet cooled, each side was ground and polished. This process produced larger sheets of high quality optical glass. It was a costly process until it was mechanized. d) During the early 20 th century drawn glass replaced cylinder glass as the most commonly available glass for construction. In the production process, flat sheets of glass were drawn directly from a molten glass container and rolled between steel rollers. The process was a continuous production line and highly mechanized. The rolled drawn glass was then ground and polished into a plate of finished sheets of glass. e) A process known as float glass was invented in 1959 in England, and produced in US since 1963, wherein the molten glass was floated across a bath of molten tin. This process has become the worldwide standard, and produces almost all the glass consumed. Below is a ribbon of float glass that has parallel surfaces, high optical quality and brilliant surface finishes. Glass terminology: Glazing is the installation of a transparent material (usually glass) into an opening. A glazier is a glass installer. Lites (or lights) are individual pieces of glass. Glass as a material....
View Full Document

Page1 / 62

HC-Lecture31-Glazing - Heavy Construction Heavy...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online