HC-Lecture63-Cranes-Tower

HC-Lecture63-Cranes-Tower - Heavy Construction Heavy...

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Unformatted text preview: Heavy Construction Heavy Lecture #63 Tower Cranes L Prieto-Portar 2008 There are three types of tower cranes: - Mobile (the tower and the boom are mounted on a mobile crane); - Rail-mounted, typical of very large construction job sites and - Climbing or self-erecting. The mobile tower-crane has a jib boom at or near the top of a latticed tower structure, which is fixed to a rotating crane body. The height is limited by the structural strength of the tower and by the feasibility of raising the structure off the ground. ground. The rail-mounted tower crane is similar to the mobile, but has a much simpler propulsion and machinery arrangement. The climbing tower crane (the most common) has a fixed tower which is intermittently supported to some other structure. The rotation of the boom is accomplished at the top of the tower. The load radius is varied by luffing the boom or with a trolley traversing the boom used as a horizontal beam. The Liebherr GTK 1100 Splash. The Liebherr horizontal jib 150. The Liebherr selferecting model 150. The climbing process (“jumping”) is one of the most critical phases of a jobsite. Both New York and Miami have experienced tower crane collapses in March 2008. When workers climb the crane, the crane cab superstructure is temporarily secured to the tower frame (mast) by resting on “dogs” or special flanges. Workers insert a new mast section, bolts, pins and other rigging. References: - S. Wood, “Heavy Construction”, Prentice-Hall Inc, New Jersey, 1977; - J. Havers, F. Stubbs, “Handbook of Heavy Construction”, Second Edition, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1971; - Travelift Cranes, Mi-Jack Products, Hazel Crest, Illinois (www.mi-jack.com); ...
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HC-Lecture63-Cranes-Tower - Heavy Construction Heavy...

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