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Thermal Analysis

Thermal Analysis - Importance of Thermal Analysis...

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Importance of Thermal Analysis square6 Approximately 70% of failures are due to thermal loads on components. square6 The failure rates of most components can double with a 20C increase in the junction temperature operating at about 50% of their rated power. square6 Electrical performance of many components is temperature dependent.
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Thermal Acceleration Factor for Typical IC Devices
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Hotter, Smaller Packaging square6 Power densities continue to increase due to : Larger chip sizes Increased dissipated power Smaller packaging technology square6 First SIA Roadmap predicts : 40 W/die by 2001- already there 200 W/die by 2007 square6 Temperature limits have remained the same: Maximum junction temperatures of 150- 175C. Reliability requires lower junction temperatures.
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Integrated Thermal Design square6 Successful design requires adequate thermal management from: Junction to Case or case to substrate Substrate (or heat sink) to External Cooling Source square6 Any one weak link in the thermal path can ruin the design. square6 Many times thermal management is an integral part of the structural design of the package. square6 Late changes to correct thermal problems can require costly redesign.
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Methods of Heat Transfer square6 Conduction Thermally conductive materials are used to transport heat from source to sink. Heat is transferred atom to atom through a material. Convection square6 Working fluid transports heat from source to sink. Heat is transferred by both diffusion and advection. square6 Radiation Heat is transferred by electromagnetic waves through liquids, gases, and vacuums.
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Conduction Heat Transfer Heat Input
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Electrical/Thermal Conductivity Area A Area A A) Thermal Flow B) Electrical Flow Heat Source T 1
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Thermal Conductivity of Various Materials
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Effect of Temperature on Thermal Conductivity
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Heat Transfer Methods
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Five Material Construction with Electrical Analog
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Parallel Heat Spreading
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Effect of Heat Spreading Spreading angle based on ratio of
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