cmstlecturenotes

cmstlecturenotes - Ch. 10:11:00 Ex: Outgroup

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ch. 3 Intercultural Communication 18/02/2010 10:11:00 Culture is a shared process where a group of people will agree on values they  choose to portray to other groups In-group   people who share a common interest or value Ex: videos we watched of abc on black and white kids vandalizing a car Out-groups   can be economic, religious, gender, ethnicity, or national out- groups Cultures have a common sense of norms, virtues; and acquire through: Imprinting: your parents tell you what’s important and what’s not important Modeling: someone in a position of authority or someone you respect, you  copy their behavior Socialization: form groups that share values such as geography, sports, or  church groups Enculturation: your own culture Acculturation: adjusting to other people’s culture A lot of these ideas were spearheaded by Hofsted He categorized culture in 4 different ways 1) individualistic vs. collectivistic cultures o individual: individual more important, eye contact, I language Ex: United States, personal advancement are put ahead of good  of company o collectivistic: group is more important, we language Ex: Japan, personal advancement put behind the good of the  company
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2) Uncertainty avoidance: willingness to change o high uncertainty avoidance   don’t want to change o low uncertainty avoidance   more willing to change ex: United States 3) Power o 6 types of power; level of formality o 1) reward power: basically when one person controls something that is  valued by the other party and they use that to get you to do what they  want you to do ex: instructor’s reward power is grades; student’s reward power  is teacher evaluations tangible power ex: paycheck; boss can control how many hours you  work intangible power ex: friendships, relationships; someone can withhold  affection the person with the power is more likely to control the  communication in the relationship and get the other  person to comply with their requests all relationships to some extent have reward power; and  the more fulfilling your relationship the more reward  power o 2) coercive power: associated with force if you don’t do what I say, I’ll punch you in the face a way to deliver positive or negative punishment 1) positive reinforcement: give you something good to coerce 2) negative reinforcement: take away something bad to coerce  you 3) positive punishment: giving something bad to coerce you 4) negative punishment: taking away something you like to  coerce you
Image of page 2
o
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern