The_Girls_in_Their_Summer_Dresses-story_and_materials002[1]

The_Girls_in_Their_Summer_Dresses-story_and_materials002[1]...

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ENG 41 1 GIRLS/SUMMER DRESSES THE GIRLS IN THEIR SUMMER DRESSES, by Irwin Shaw STUDY GUIDE QUESTIONS 1. Who are the main characters of the story? 2. Where does the story take place? Where are Michael and/or Frances originally from? 3. When (currently, in the recent past. distant past. etc.) does the story take place? Why do you think so? How much time passes in the course of the story? 4. What POINT OF VIEW is the story told from? How do you know this? (Read Pgs. 19--20 in the 411 Reader on Point of View, and then try to determine the story's point of view.) 5. About how old are Michael and Frances? Give line references to support your anwets. 6. What socio—economic group would you put Michael and Frances in? Why? 7. Based on the text, try to describe the physical appearances of Michael and Frances. 8. What can you say about Michael's profession? What is Frances' profession? 9. How much do Michael and Frances drink durin g the course of the story? Is this a significant point? Why/why not? 10. Is Michael's behavior unusual? Is he a realistic character? Why/VVhy not? Eng 411 Motai Making Inferences When You Read Fiction Inference: An inference is a logical and general conclusion, assumption or guess based on the information observed or provided. When you read fiction you have to make inferences (sometimes called “reading between the lines”) to fiilly understand the characters and the message of the story, and to enjoy or learn from it. To make inferences you need to: 0 take into account all the facts you’ve been given about the circumstances of a character 0 examine what a character has said and done 0 analyze the feelings the character reveals (verbally or non-verbally) This requires careful reading and a willingness not to accept the “easy and obvious” explanation for a character’s actions or words. For example, in “Girls in Their Summer Dresses” we could say that the reason Frances was so upset with Michael was because he looked at other women when he was with her. It would be ‘true’. But the real reasons she is upset are much more complex and interesting than that, and to understand them we need to make inferences about her behavior, emotional responses, words, and so on. Why put so much effort into understanding a story? Because, more than from anything else, we learn about ourselves and others from reading fiction; we often see a mirror of ourselves or those close to us in a story’s characters or situations. We can use that information to analyze our actions or feelings and gain important self-knowledge. INFERENCES ARE SUBJECTIVE Do we all make the same inferences given the same information? Listen to the following descriptive paragraph and then make a list of adjectives and phrases that you would use to describe the person written about below: Essentially, I believe that people are good at heart, and want the best for other human beings. I believe that someday the people of the world will all work together to end war, starvation and disease. I believe that we will solve the problem of homeless people in our societies through realizing that it is necessary and easy to share with others. I believe that one day we will also realize the value and importance of freedom and that there will be true freedom for all people and true equality among people. When people have achieved their highest good, there will be no more need for prisons or war. I believe these things because I believe in the goodness of humans, and for that reason I can live with hope today. Descriptive words/phrases: 41 1 Girls Summer Dresses Inference {Meaning MAKING INFERENCES FROM DIAGLOGUE T0 DISCOVER WHAT A CHARACTER MEANS Much of what is meant and felt by the characters in The Girls in Their Summer Dresses" is not told explicitly; readers need to make inferences, to ‘read between the lines" to fully understand what Michael and Frances are trying to reveal to each other, and how they are feeling about their marriage. In this exercise, you will try to fill in the blanks by making inferences about what you think has been left unsaid, or what Michael or Frances actually meant to say but did not say explicitly. Examp: l. (12) 'Youll break your neck...” (if you don't stop looking at every woman messesl 2. (21) 'Mike, darling...“ 3. (59) "Darling, this is Fifth Avenue...' 4. (76) “Or maybe you'd just rather walk up and down Fifth Avenue..." 5. (61) "You always look at other women. At every damn woman in the City of New York...'__________________________________ '6. (93) 'You ought to see the look in your eye as you casually inspect the Universe on Fifth Avenue..__________..__,_______‘ 7. (99) 'Frances,baby...' 6. (l l 1) Whenever something good happens, don't I run to you? When something bad happens don‘t I cry on your shoulder?.. 9. (113) "Yes. You look at every women that passes...‘ 10 11 12 1,3- 14. 15. 16. 17. 16. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. .(116) Mylord;Frances!.'—-——__________ . (143,145) 'All right..Au right. . (154) "There's no law...“ (203) 'If it's just a coupxe of fur coats, and forty-five dollar hats...” ———-——“_____§_ (207) 'Go ahead...'———‘_M_________ (232) 'You say you love me?._‘__________~_- (236) "You‘re beautiful...‘ MM“ (2 40) 'You'd like to be free to...'——__~‘__ M“ (250) 'Someday you're going to make a move...‘—.______ (256) “Yes. I know...“ NK‘__ (260) 'At least (16 me one {nonfk'fih (206) 'I want to listen. (2 46) “Well, anytime you say... (247) 'Don't be foolish...“ Eng 41 l Motai GIRLS IN THEIR SUMMER DRESSES, by Irwin Shaw DISCUSSION Here are some issues in the story to think about: 1. What kind of communication have Michael and Frances established up to the time of the story? Have they been open and honest? Have they hidden feelings? (Support your responses with text references and inferences about these.) 2. Based on the conversation they have during the story, what are Michael’s expectations and needs from the relationship? What are Frances’ expectations and needs? Do their expectations and needs harmonize? Is there a way to bring them into harmony? 3. Is trust essential to open, honest communication in a relationship? Have Michael and Frances built up trust in their relationship? What effect do you think their sudden open communication has or will have on their relationship? 10 Eng 411 Motai Analuing a Short Story (or any piece of writing): Examples from “Girls in Their Summer Dresses” When we analyze a story (or article, essay, etc.) our goal is to discover the author’s intention in writing the story—in other words, what message was he trying to give readers through his story, about a character or life in general? The way we determine this is by reading carefully and then interpreting the author’s message, presented in the themes of the story, e. g., ‘Trust is an essential part of a close and secure marriage’. We then set out to prove that our interpretation is “correct”. We do this by re-reading the text and finding “evidence” in the story—the characters’ words, actions, thoughts, etc. that reveal the message. We stick strictly to the text of the story, because we are trying to find the author’s meaning, not to simply express our own response to the character or message. In other words, although interesting, what you believe personally—what in your personal view characters should or should not do-- is not the point here: this is not part of analyzing the author’s message or theme. Thus, if you say “Michael should not have looked at other women because married people have to be faithfiil to each other forever” it is not analysis. The author never made reference to these points and we can find no evidence in the text to prove that the author believes this; you’ve expressed your own personal judgment. What you can say is “When he looks at other women Michael hurts and worries Frances, which may endanger the security of their marriage.” You can prove this statement with references to dialogue and situations from the text (not from your personal values and judgment, which is outside the story). In this kind of analytical essay, your opinion of the story’s message can be expressed in a general way in the conclusion if you choose to do this. 11 Eng 41 l Motai Sample Summary of “Girls in Their Summer Dresses,” by Irwin Shaw “Girls in Their Summer Dresses,” by Irwin Shaw, is a story set in New York City, about a husband and wife who are planning to spend a romantic Sunday together but instead encounter a conflict about a difficult issue in their marriage. Michael, a relatively young, professional man, continually looks at women while out with his pretty wife, Frances. Frances perceives this open appraisal of other women as a threat to the security of their marriage, stating that Michael appears to want freedom from the marriage. After a tense conversation Michael admits that he would like to be free but does not communicate clearly to Frances what he means by this. Frances responds by suggesting that they join friends rather than spend the rest of the day by themselves, appearing to want put both emotional and physical distance between her and Michael. 12 Eng 411 Motai "GIRLS IN THEIR SUMMER DRESSES,” by Irwin Shaw WRITING ASSIGNMENT In the story “Girls in Their Summer Dresses,” by Irwin Shaw, we can infer a great deal about the state of Michael’s and Frances’ relationship based on the conversation they have during a Sunday morning walk on New York City’s Fifth Avenue. ASSIGNMENT: In a well-organized essay, using the story to illustrate your points, discuss the issue of honesty and communication in Michael’s and Frances’ relationship. First, discuss whether the couple have been honest about their feelings, expectations and needs up to the moment of the story; use text references and your inferences about these to support your statements. Then, discuss their honesty with each other during the time the story takes place. Are they finally honest with each other? What needs, expectations and emotions do they communicate at this time? Based on their dialogue and your inferences about it, is the honesty beneficial or detrimental to their relationship, and in what ways? What effects does it produce in each character? In your conclusion, broaden the discussion to include your own opinion of the honesty issue. Is total honesty the best policy in a relationship? Why or why not, in your opinion? Briefly explain your position. DUE DATES: 13 ...
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This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course ENG 411 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at S.F. State.

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