Philosophy_110_chp1[1]

Philosophy_110_chp1[1] - 1/30/2009 Welcome! This course is...

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1/30/2009 1 Welcome! Instructor: Michael Olsen (Mike) Spring 2009 San Francisco State University This course is part of a field of study known as Logic Logic derives from the Greek root “ logos ,” which means “word or account.” Specifically, we are concerned about arguments as they arise in our everyday lives. Just being clear on what is being argued! Tina Fey as Sarah Palin : "I liked being here tonight answering these tough questions without the filter of the mainstream gotcha media with their […] 'incessant need to figure out what your words mean and why ya put them in that order.' Grading Due Three Exams (@25% each) Exam 1 3/6/09 Exam 2 4/10/09 Exam 3 Final Homework (20%) Mondays 2 lowest homework scores will be dropped. So, 10 assignments will count toward this grade. Attendance (5%) 2.5% deduction from this final grade for each absence. 2 “freebies.” “Perfect” Attendance Policy – I will boost your final grade in the course by half a gradation. E.g. C+ to a B-, B+ to an A- and so forth. Critical thinking is a skill You must do your homework (practice!) to be successful in this course. “Critical” comes from the Greek word kritikós” meaning “one who discerns.” In this class, we will attempt to discern good arguments from bad arguments. To begin, however, we need to be clear on what an argument is , and what is being argued .
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1/30/2009 2 Disagreements! We disagree everyday. Some issues about which we disagree are extremely important. (e.g. who should be the next President of the United States? Should we withdraw armed forces from Iraq? Should gay people be allowed to marry? Should people eat meat? Do animals have rights? ) May be less important. Some of the weirdest: Are UFO’s real? Are psychics the real-thing? Have aliens landed on Earth? Even in these cases, however, we would use rational persuasion, if we are being rational, instead of rhetoric in order to get someone to believe our point of view. Should you call up the psychic hotline and hand over your $1 a minute? Or what about the testimony of someone concerning a weight loss drug? Does it matter or is it relevant that some people testify on behalf of these? Arguments are in commercials, speeches, letters, songs, etcetera. Arguments are used to persuade, convince, to get you to hand over your money, and so on. Violence
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Philosophy_110_chp1[1] - 1/30/2009 Welcome! This course is...

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