Philosophy_110_chp4[1]

Philosophy_110_chp4[1] - Statements of the form If then...

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2/13/2009 1 Statements of the form “If, then” should not be reworded! This includes “unless.” Elliptical Arguments Often times, when an argument is presented, a premise or a conclusion is left implicit. These types of arguments are called elliptical arguments , or enthymemes. The implicit statement is common knowledge. The implicit statement is weak or absurd. The bigger the burger the better the burger. The burgers are bigger at Burger King. What is missing in this argument? The burgers are better at Burger King. So, why have an argument presented in this manner?
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2/13/2009 2 We are, psychologically, more likely to believe a conclusion that is simply left for us to infer in this way. The same as we have been doing, but we must somehow show that a statement has been added to the argument. So, we must do argument analysis on this. And we will use (A) to symbolize an
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This note was uploaded on 09/16/2011 for the course PHIL 110 taught by Professor Kay during the Spring '07 term at S.F. State.

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Philosophy_110_chp4[1] - Statements of the form If then...

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