Chapter 3

Chapter 3 - Chapter 3 The Federal F ramework-Federalism a...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 3 The Federal F ramework-Federalism a system of government in which power is divided, by a constitution, between a central government and regional governments.--Unitary systems A centralized government system in which lower levels of government have little power independent of the national government-Central government makes the decisions-Lower levels of government primarily implement decisions made by the central government-Federal system a system of government in which the national government shares power with lower levels of government, such as states.-Nations such as Switzerland and Canada, with lower levels of government, have this Federalism in the Constitution-United States was first nation to adopt federalism-Framers sought to limit the national government by creating a second layer of state governments _American federalism recognizes 2 sovereigns The Powers of the National Government- Expressed powers - specific powers granted by the Constitution to Congress (Article I, Section 8), and to the president (Article I I)-Power to collect taxes, to coin money, to declare war, and to regulate commerce- Implied powers Powers derived from the necessary and proper clause of Article I, Section 8, of the Constitution. Such powers are not specifically expressed but are implied through the expansive interpretation of delegated powers-Enable Congress to make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers.- Necessary and proper clause Article I, Section 8, of the Constitution, it provides Congress with the authority to make all laws necessary and proper to carry out its expressed powers. The Powers of State Government-The Tenth Amendment states that the powers that the Constitution does not delegate to the national government or prohibit to the states are reserved to the Sates respectively, or to the people.-Reserved powers powers derived from the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution that is not specifically-Coercion the power to develop and enforce criminal codes, to administer health and safety rules, to regulate the family via marriage and divorce laws....
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Chapter 3 - Chapter 3 The Federal F ramework-Federalism a...

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