Legislative_Branch_Ch_12_Ginsberg_Fall_2009[1]

Legislative_Branch_Ch_12_Ginsberg_Fall_2009[1] - The...

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The Legislative Branch: Congress Refer to Chapter 12 in Ginsberg
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Overview Dual Nature of Congress Representation Legislation Constitutional Foundation Representation Article 1 Bicameralism Elections Styles, Organization, and Procedures House vs. Senate Party and Committee System; Leadership How a Bill Becomes Law Legislative Tactics
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Dual Nature of Congress Representation Accountability to constituencies, districts Roles of representation Legislation Lawmaking function Earmarks, party accountability, credit-taking Committees, expertise, experience
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CONSTITUTIONAL FOUNDATION
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Representation “In republican government, the legislative authority dominates.” --James Madison Fundamental function of legislature: representation Theories of representation: Sociological representation Who runs for Congress? Agency Representation Trustee vs. Delegate Representation provided in Article 1
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Comparing Legislative Bodies US House of Reps. Brit. House of Commons 2 yr. terms No more than 5 yrs. Elections every 2 yrs Discretion of gov’t No Executive Control Executive Control 2 Parties 9 parties **The US Congress is an independently empowered Institution as opposed to the British Parliament **US Congress is politically powerful in policy- making process.
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Constitutional Foundation: Article 1 “Although the three branches supposedly are coequal, the legislature takes the lead in formulating the structure and the duties of the other two.” National Powers Financing the government Design of other branches Powers enlarged by congressional amendments Foreign relations Expressed and Implied Powers
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Foundation: Article 1 Cont’d Bicameralism Elections Qualifications for Congressional Members Powers of the House vs. Senate Congressional Privileges How a Bill Becomes Law Enumerated and Implied Powers (Art. 1, Sec. 8) Checks on the executive and judicial branches
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Bicameralism “All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives.” -- U.S. Constitution In order to control the legislative authority, you must divide it.” -- Federalist 51
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This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course POLS 1150 taught by Professor Nichols during the Fall '08 term at GCSU.

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Legislative_Branch_Ch_12_Ginsberg_Fall_2009[1] - The...

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