solutions4 - Add the following labs to the diagram below:...

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Bio 20A-M. Dalbey Macromolecules Additional Problems 4/6/08 2 of 2 1. Which radioactive isotope or isotopes (see notes for Chapter 2) would be most useful for specifically labeling nucleic acids but not proteins? 32 P and 33 P Which of these isotopes would be most useful for labeling proteins but not nucleic acids? 35 S See Fig. 11.4 on p. 236 for a famous experimental application of the nucleic acid/protein double-labeling method. 2.
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Unformatted text preview: Add the following labs to the diagram below: Label the polarity of the 2 DNA strands Label each of the bases. Bio 20A-M. Dalbey Macromolecules Additional Problems 4/6/08 2 of 2 3. The base pairs should look similar to the ones in Fig. 3.24 and 11.9. The trick is that one base in each pair must be flipped over. This should serve as reminder that, although the bases are planar molecular structures, they do have 2 sides (unlike the ink on the paper). Here is the AT pair as an example. Notice that the arrows should represent hydrogen bonds....
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This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course BIO 20a taught by Professor Dalby during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Santa Cruz.

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solutions4 - Add the following labs to the diagram below:...

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