Louis Armstrong influenced early jazz by revolutionizing the jazz solo and instrumentation in early

Louis Armstrong influenced early jazz by revolutionizing the jazz solo and instrumentation in early

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Joseph So Ethno 50a Born on August 4, 1901, Louis Daniel Armstrong would become the most famous and influential jazz trumpeter of the 20 th century. Louis Armstrong began his career playing in New Orleans clubs and saloons in his early teens. By the 1920’s Armstrong began to gain prominence, touring the country and leading his own band, the Hot Five, and the Hot Seven. Throughout the rest of his life, Armstrong would acquire fame through his great talent in jazz improvisation, singing, and film. Louis Armstrong influenced early jazz by revolutionizing the phrasing, rhythm, and technique of the jazz solo, as well as the solo’s role within early Jazz. Additionally Armstrong would reinvent and popularize the trumpet, while standardizing the instrumentation in early jazz. Louis Armstrong’s innovative technique, rhythm, and phrasing redefined the solos role within jazz. One of Armstrong’s most innovative contributions to jazz was the incredible range he managed to play with. In the solo of “Mandy Make up you Mind”, “Armstrong’s range is extended at its upper end. No longer required to stay in the instrument’s middle register Louis could roam over the entire trumpet range” (Schuller 1986: 96). Thus Armstrong expanded the repertoire of solos by literally extending the playable scale, which he would later extend to a high E flat. Additionally, Armstrong showed he could complement his incredible range with an extraordinary stamina. In “Hotter than Hot”, Armstrong manages to hit twelve high C’s over eight bars in his final solo (Schuller 1986: 96). Thus Armstrong influenced early jazz by setting the bar for future soloists.
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Armstrong matched his incredible technique with exceptional phrasing. His solo in “Lazy River” encapsulates his groundbreaking approach to phrasing, when he, “ignores the notated melody entirely, pitching most of the first line on a single note and using strongly syncopated phrasing. In the second stanza he breaks into an almost fully improvised melody, which he evolves into a classic passage of Armstrong scat singing” (Schuller 1986: 131). Armstrong innovated solo phrasing by changing solos from
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This note was uploaded on 09/16/2011 for the course POLI SCI 125 taught by Professor O'neill during the Spring '11 term at UCLA.

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Louis Armstrong influenced early jazz by revolutionizing the jazz solo and instrumentation in early

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