negot paper - JosephSo Negotiations171D Date ProfessorONeil

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Joseph So Negotiations 171D Date Professor O’Neil Key Elements in Military-Civilian Negotiations in Iraq Abstract: As the United States continues its efforts to establish stability, security,  transition, and reconstruction within Iraq, negotiations between US military and  Iraqi civilians will be a common activity. By applying negotiation theory and  research to interviews of US officers stationed in Iraq, this paper identifies the  key elements that influence negotiations in this unique environment. I argue that  within negotiations between US military and Iraqi civilians, context, culture, and  power are the most significant influences that can change the outcome of a  negotiation. 
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Introduction On March 19, 2003 the combined forces of the United States, United  Kingdom, and smaller contingents from Australia and Poland invaded Iraq in the  conflict known as the Iraq War. In 21 days of major combat operations, the United  States and its allies toppled the regime of Saddam Hussein on May 1, 2003.  Since that time the United States soldiers in Iraq have undergone a stability,  security, transition, and reconstruction (SSTR) operation in Iraq while  simultaneously fighting a counterinsurgency.  As US forces work to rebuild a new democratic Iraqi government,  individual soldiers from Junior to Senior leaders conduct thousands of  negotiations with Iraqi leaders while pursuing tactical and operational objectives.  This paper provides an analysis of negotiations between U.S. Military officers and  local civilian in their efforts to bring stability, security, transition, and  reconstruction to Iraq. Based on research and analysis of officer’s experiences,  this paper identifies three key elements of negotiation that are integral in SSTR  operations. First is the context in which negotiations take place and which make  these negotiations especially unique and demanding. The second element that is  closely related to context, cultural differences, can significantly affect the conduct  and outcome of a negotiation. Finally the element of power plays a significant  and unique role, especially in the context of military-civilian negotiations. 
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Although the examples provided in this paper pertain specifically to US soldiers in  Iraq, the concepts and analysis regarding negotiations can be applied to  everyday situations. CONTEXT It seems obvious that context and preparation shape the outcome of a  negotiation however properly understanding the context of situational  negotiations allows individuals to know when to properly apply fundamental  principles of negotiation theory and research. In Army and Marine officer 
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This note was uploaded on 09/16/2011 for the course POLI SCI 125 taught by Professor O'neill during the Spring '11 term at UCLA.

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negot paper - JosephSo Negotiations171D Date ProfessorONeil

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