The Cold War--Revised

The Cold War--Revised - The Cold War 1945-1991 Wartime...

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The Cold War 1945-1991
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Wartime Diplomacy Casablanca (January 1943) Tehran (November 1943) Stalin agreed to assist the Americans and British in the Pacific as soon as hostilities ended in Europe. FDR promised a second front would be established within six months. Stalin wanted to annex all of Poland. FDR and Churchill did not agree.
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Yalta (February 1945) The five major powers—the U.S., Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and China—would have veto power over all decisions made in the UN. Stalin still wanted to annex Poland; he currently had military occupation of Poland. Stalin wanted a communist Poland while Churchill and FDR wanted a democratic one.
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Yalta (February 1945) FDR wanted a reunited Germany; Stalin wanted heavy reparations and permanent dismemberment of Germany. Nothing would be resolved concerning reparations. The Big Three did agree to partition Germany. Each country along with France would occupy and control part of Germany after the war. Stalin left Yalta believing that he had approval to begin taking over the small nations of Eastern Europe. One by one he would make establish communist “puppet” governments.
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Potsdam (July 1945) Truman, Clement Atlee of Great Britain, and Stalin met. Truman had already conceded Poland to Stalin. Truman refused Soviet demands for reparations from Germany. Germany would remain divided; East Germany went to the Soviet Union while West Germany was divided among the U.S., Great Britain, and France.
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The Doctrine of Containment Communism and the Soviet Union viewed as a growing and dangerous threat. American diplomat George F. Kennan promoted the idea that the only effective way to handle the growing threat of communism was to “contain” it by doing whatever was necessary to keep it from spreading to unaffected nations. This would become the official policy of the United States until the 1980s.
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The Truman Doctrine “I believe that it must be the policy of the United States to support free peoples who are resisting attempted subjugation by armed minorities or by outside pressures.” He also asked for $400 million to intervene on behalf of Turkey and Greece to aid them in resisting communism.
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The Marshall Plan Secretary of State George Marshall favored U.S. funding to help rebuild Europe. Why did he think the U.S. should spend billions of dollars overseas?
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The Iron Curtain At a commencement speech in Fulton, MO, Churchill remarked that “an Iron Curtain has descended across the Continent.” This term identified the imaginary line that separated free and communist Europe.
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Chiang Kai-shek was a leader of China that was friendly to the U.S. but his government
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The Cold War--Revised - The Cold War 1945-1991 Wartime...

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