Death of a toad

Death of a toad - Scarlett Hood The Death of a toad In...

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Scarlett Hood The Death of a toad In Richard Wilbur’s poem, “The Death of a Toad,” Wilbur juxtaposes very formal language with the death of a very low creature, a toad. He employs sophisticated diction, unique syntax, and detailed imagery throughout the poem. These elements and the juxtaposition reveal Wilbur’s response to the death of this toad as a feeling of respect towards all animals and all creatures. Wilbur utilizes words such as, sanctuaried, monotone, and ebullient, and carries comprehensive imagery in each stanza in order to emphasize his response completely. Wilbur desires to give the toad importance and allow people to care about creatures that die due to the carelessness of people. He also wishes to give the toad innocence because he died from the mouth of a mower when a man was mowing his yard. The elements, diction, syntax, and imagery assist in creating this innocence, importance, and respectfulness that the toad deserves. Wilbur employs the word “sanctuaried” in the first stanza when the toad is running away
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This document was uploaded on 09/15/2011.

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Death of a toad - Scarlett Hood The Death of a toad In...

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