AYE AYE - Aye- Aye The Worlds Largest Nocturnal Primate By:...

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Aye- Aye The World’s Largest Nocturnal Primate By: Noreena Chaudari & Chelsea Martin
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Introduction: The Aye Aye is native to Madagascar & has a long history with the native people. --> Superstition. Viewed as an omen of bad luck! Natives often kill because of this. The meaning of it’s name has been lost but may be just a simple cry of alarm to alert other people of it’s presents.
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Classification: Order PRIMATES Suborder Strepsirrhini: non tarsier prosimians Infraorder Chiromyiformes Family Daubentoniidae » Genus Daubentonia ~Aye-Aye, Daubentonia madagascariensis *Years ago there used to be a Giant Aye- Aye but it is now extinct.
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Habitat: Native to Madagascar. East Coast. Used to live on Northwest coast. Survives in the canopy of rainforest & deciduous forest. Almost NEVER touches the ground, prefers to be above 700 meters high. Due to habitat destruction they sometimes must occupy plantations.
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Habitat Cont. Aye-Ayes nest during the day and eat at night. Their nests are made of Ball-like nests. Closed spheres with single entry points. Found in the forks of trees.
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Population Estimates: So how many are there? For wild populations- 1965: 12 to 20 animals 1967: 50 or less 1974: No more than 50 1994: About 1,000 2007: Figures unknown but estimates range between 1,000 and 10,000 Aye- Ayes
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This note was uploaded on 09/12/2011 for the course SCIENCE bio 200 taught by Professor Roy during the Fall '11 term at McGill.

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AYE AYE - Aye- Aye The Worlds Largest Nocturnal Primate By:...

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