MR-4 - Chapters45 (1777 1855 (1000200BC...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Mathematics for Economists Chapters 4-5 Linear Models and Matrix Algebra Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777– 1855) The Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art (1000-200 BC)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Objectives of math for economists     To understand mathematical economics problems by  stating the unknown, the data and the conditions To plan solutions to these problems by finding a  connection between the data and the unknown To carry out your plans for solving mathematical  economics problems To examine the solutions to mathematical economics  problems for general insights into current and future  problems Remember: Math econ is like love – a simple idea but it  can get complicated. 2
Background image of page 2
4. Linear Algebra Some history: The beginnings of matrices and determinants goes back to  the second century BC although traces can be seen back to  the fourth century BC. But, the ideas did not make it to  mainstream math until the late 16 th  century The Babylonians around 300 BC studied problems which  lead to simultaneous linear equations. The Chinese, between 200 BC and 100 BC, came much  closer to matrices than the Babylonians. Indeed, the text  Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art  written during the  Han Dynasty gives the first known example of matrix  methods. In Europe, two-by-two determinants were considered by  Cardano  at the end of the 16 th  century and larger ones by 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4. What is a Matrix? A matrix is a set of elements, organized into rows and  columns d c b a rows columns  a and d are the diagonal elements.   b and c are the off-diagonal elements.  Matrices are like plain numbers in many ways: they can be  added, subtracted, and, in some cases, multiplied and inverted  (divided).   
Background image of page 4
4. Matrix: Details     Examples: 5 [ ] δ β α = - = b d b A ; 1 1 Dimensions of a matrix: numbers of rows by  numbers of  columns. The Matrix A is a 2x2 matrix, b is a 1x3 matrix. A matrix with only one column or only one row is called a  vector . If a matrix has an equal numbers of rows and columns, it is  called a  square  matrix. Matrix A, above, is a square matrix. Usual Notation Upper case letters => matrices Lower case => vectors
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4.1 Matrix multiplication: Details Multiplication of matrices requires a  conformability condition The conformability condition  for multiplication is that the  column  dimensions of the lead  matrix  must be equal to the  row  dimension of the lag  matrix  B If  A  is an ( m x n ) and  B  an ( n x p ) matrix (A has the same  number of columns a B has rows), then we define the product  of  AB
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 76

MR-4 - Chapters45 (1777 1855 (1000200BC...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online