Test 3 Lecture Notes

Test 3 Lecture Notes - Test 3 Lecture Notes Chapter 35:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Test 3 Lecture Notes Chapter 35: Plant Structure, Growth, and Development Concept 35.1: The plant body has a hierarchy of organs, tissues, and cells The Three Basic Plant Organs Plants draw nutrients from 2 very different environments: below ground and above ground 3 basic organs 1. Roots 2. Stems 3. Leaves Organized into the root and shoot system Figure 35.2 Clicker Question Roots are involved in all but which of the following activities? Support Food storage Food production Anchorage Roots An organ that anchors the vascular plant Absorbs minerals and water Absorption occurs near root tips Root hairs increase the surface area of the root Store organic nutrients Figure 35.3 Stems Consists of: Nodes- points at which leaves are attached Internodes- segment between nodules Axillary Buds- potential to form lateral shoot (i.e. branch) Terminal bud- located at shoot tip, causes elongation of a young shoot Figure 35.2 Leaves The leaf is the main photosynthetic organ of most vascular plants Consist of: A flattened blade The petiole- joins the leaf to a node of the system Figure 35.2 Simple vs. Compound Leaves Simple leaf: a single, undivided blade Some may have deep lobes Compound leaf: blade consists of multiple leaflets Doubly compound leaf: each leaflet is divided into smaller leaflets Figure 35.6 The Three Tissue Systems: Dermal, Vascular, and Ground Dermal: consists of the epidermis and periderm Vascular: carries out transport of materials between roots and shoots Xylem: conveys water and minerals up from roots Phloem: transports organic nutrients from sources to sinks Ground tissue: various functions including storage, photosynthesis, and support Figure 35.8 Differentiated Plant Cells Parenchyma Thin flexible primary cell walls; alive at maturity; carry out most metabolism within the plant Collenchymas Unevenly thickened, but flexible primary cell walls; alive at maturity; supports young growing stems (for example: celery) Sclerenchyma Thick, rigid secondary cell walls; dead at maturity; provides support (for example: the flesh of pears) Figure 35.10 Differentiated Plant Cells Xylem: conducts water and minerals from roots Tubular cells; dead at maturity • Tracheids; thin, tubular cells; cell walls contain pits (thin regions with only primary cell walls) • Vessel elements: short, wide tubular cells Phloem: conducts organic compounds Sieve- tube members: conducting cells; alive but not many organelles Companion cells: nonconducting cells; alive and supports the sieve-tube members Figure 35.10 Clicker Question Unlike collenchymas and sclerenchyma tissues, parenchyma tissue does not function in _________....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 09/12/2011 for the course BIOL 1201 taught by Professor Wishtichusen during the Fall '07 term at LSU.

Page1 / 30

Test 3 Lecture Notes - Test 3 Lecture Notes Chapter 35:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online