AUTOIMMUNE DISORDERS report

AUTOIMMUNE DISORDERS report - Prepared by: Mark Dino B....

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Prepared by: Mark Dino B. Albiela, R.N.
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A Group of 60 to 80 chronic inflammatory diseases with genetic predisposition and environmental modulation Prevalence of 5% to 8% in US Prevalence is greater for females than males 75% of cases 4 th largest disease class in women
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Genetic (HLA type) Female X chromosome inactivation Environmental Smoking with RA Drugs Procainamide, minocycline, quinidine Infections
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Tissue/ Organ Specific Grave’s Disease Myasthenia gravis Not tissue specific, but tend to accumulate forming inflammatory response Acute glomerulonephritis Systemic Systemic lupus erythematosus Rheumatoid arthritis
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The mechanism that causes immune system to  recognize host tissue as foreign is not clear.  The following factors are the possible  contributors to autoimmune disorders: Release of previously “hidden” antigens into the  circulation, such as DNA or other components of cell  nucleus Chemical, physical or biologic changes in host tissue  that cause self-antigens to stimulate the production of  autoantibodies
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Introduction of an antigen, such as bacteria or  virus whose antigenic properties closely  resemble those of host tissue. A defect in normal cellular immune function  that allows the cells to produce antibodies Initiation of the autoimmune response by very  slow – growing mycobacteria.
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Most common cause of hyperthyroidism  (thyrotoxicosis) Incidence of 50-80 cases / 100,000 population /  year Female to male ratio of 8:1 Effector mechanisms involve auto-reactive  antibodies Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor  (Thyrotropin receptor) Thyroid peroxidase / Thyroperoxidase (TPO) Thyroglobulin
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Risk factors HLADR3 Smoking for ophthalmopathy (5x)   Treatment Anti-thyroid drugs Methimazole (Tapazole) Radioactive iodine I-131 Surgery Thyroidectomy
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Acquired autoimmune disorder Clinically characterized by: Weakness of skeletal muscles  Fatigability on exertion. First clinical description in 1672 by 
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Dr.hickenbottom during the Spring '10 term at West Liberty.

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AUTOIMMUNE DISORDERS report - Prepared by: Mark Dino B....

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