ADJ 235 - Week 8 - Professional Ethical Standards - Assignment

ADJ 235 - Week 8 - Professional Ethical Standards - Assignment

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Running head: PROFESSIONAL ETHICAL STANDARDS 1 Professional Ethical Standards Ronda White ADJ 235 University of Phoenix, Axia College January 24, 2011 Facilitator, George DeAngelis
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Running head: PROFESSIONAL ETHICAL STANDARDS 1
Background image of page 2
PROFESSIONAL ETHICAL STANDARDS 2 Professional Ethical Standards Introduction Each year more than 240 million callers attempt to receive emergency services (Dispatch Magazine On-Line, 2008). Who handles all of these phone calls? Communications centers that field 911 phone calls are staffed with trained 911 operators, also called communication officers in some areas. These men and women answer calls daily from victims of crime, individuals seeking emergency medical or fire services, concerned community members, and on rare occasions, the criminals themselves. Answering the calls and prioritizing them for law enforcement officers, emergency medical technicians (EMT), and fire departments requires knowledge, patience, discretion, and ethics. The Job According to Eastside Regional Communications Center (2008), 911 dispatchers answer phones for both emergency and non-emergency calls for not only law enforcement but medical and fire services as well. These individuals work with computer-aided dispatching services as well as computerized phone and radio systems. Dispatch Magazine On-Line also states that these individuals must prioritize these calls when numerous phone calls come into the center at the same time. Dispatchers must complete clerical work, retrieve information from callers using various computer and phone systems, monitor radio frequencies, and relay relevant information between officers and callers. This is only a partial list of duties for a public safety dispatcher. Dispatchers may be required to assume other tasks as needed because of short staff, budget cuts, and situations that have never before been dealt with. Individuals seeking a career as a public safety dispatcher need the ability to remain calm and confident, be knowledgeable, maintain patience, calm down the caller, and maintain high morals.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
PROFESSIONAL ETHICAL STANDARDS 2
Background image of page 4
PROFESSIONAL ETHICAL STANDARDS 3 A Day in the Life No two days are alike for an individual who works in a communications center dispatching 911 calls. Each day, these professionals deal with a variety of calls from callers seeking a wide array of emergency services. A dispatcher may be answering calls within seconds of arrival to work. He or she may also go a complete shift without a single emergency call, especially if working in a small community. If two dispatchers are asked what they did
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 10

ADJ 235 - Week 8 - Professional Ethical Standards - Assignment

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online