02_ActiveLecturePRS - How is it possible for two samples of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How is it possible for two samples of hydrogen to contain the same number of atoms, yet one sample weighs more than the other? 1. One sample has more bonds. 2. One sample contains fewer electrons, decreasing weight. 3. One sample contains more of hydrogen’s heavier isotope(s). 4. One sample includes more protons, increasing weight.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What is a mole and why is it useful to describe elements in terms of moles? 1. 6.023 x 1023/easier to keep track of relative numbers of atoms in chemical samples 2. Is a quantity with a weight in grams equal to that element’s atomic weight/because one mole of a given element always contains the same number of atoms as one mole of any other element 3. The total number of neutrons and protons in the nucleus/nuclei sometimes emit subatomic particles or radiation in measurable amounts 4. A and B are correct
Background image of page 2
Which kind of bond holds atoms in a water molecule together? What attracts water molecules to one another? 1. Polar covalent bonds; hydrogen bonds 2. Ionic bonds; charge interactions 3. Hydrogen bonds; charge interactions 4. Covalent bonds; hydrogen bonds
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Both oxygen and neon are gases at room temperature. Oxygen combines readily with other elements, but neon does not. Why? 1. Neon has 8 electrons in its valence shell, oxygen has only 6. 2. Neon cannot undergo bonding due to its polarity. 3. Neon is exergonic. 4. Neon’s molecular weight is too low to allow bonding.
Background image of page 4
The chemical shorthand used to describe chemical compounds and reactions effectively is known as__. 1. Molecular formula 2. Chemical notation 3. Molecular weight 4. Mass number
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Which of these notations describes dehydration synthesis and why? 1.
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course BIOL 2401 taught by Professor Rameriz during the Spring '11 term at University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson.

Page1 / 26

02_ActiveLecturePRS - How is it possible for two samples of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online