Study GuideTest1 - Pillow Basalts Sheeted Dikes GEOL 111 Mantle Gabbro Chapter 1(magma chamber Study Guide Test 1 Iron deposits in the great lakes

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Pillow Basalts Sheeted Dikes Mantle Gabbro (magma chamber) GEOL 111 Study Guide: Test 1 Chapter 1: Iron deposits in the great lakes area and eastern Canada are actually BFI (Banded Iron Formation) and they are good for collectors. The thickness of continental crust and oceanic crust vary widely, they are not of a uniform thickness. Everything is estimation. Although continental crust(25km-65km) is always thicker than oceanic crust(5km-10km). The lithosphere is relatively strong and solidly attached to the overlying crust. The athenosphere is mostly solid, but it is hotter than the lithosphere and it can flow under pressure. Isostasy – The concept of different thicknesses of crust floating on the mantle. It explains most of the variations in elevation from one region to another, and it is commonly paraphrased by saying mountain belts have thick crustal roots. The Hydrologic Cycle
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Internal Energy – Comes from within the earth and includes heat energy trapped when the planet formed and heat produced by radioactive decay. External Energy – Most significant source is the Sun, which bathes Earth in light, thermal energy and other electromagnetic energy. Most rocks do not go through the entire cycle but instead move through only part of the cycle. The different steps in the rock cycle can happen in almost any order. Diverse environments produce many different types of rocks that, depending on the classification scheme, are grouped into three or four families. To interpret how rocks form, we observe modern environments and note the dominant types of sediment, lava, or other material. We infer that these same materials
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would have been produced in older, prehistoric versions of that environment. By doing this, we use modern examples to interpret ancient rocks and to understand how they formed. In this way, the present is the key to the past . Uniformitarianism assumes that the same natural laws and processes that operate in the universe now, have always operated in the universe in the past and apply everywhere in the universe. The law of superposition (or the principle of superposition ) is a key axiom based on observations of natural history that is a foundational principle of sedimentary stratigraphy (a branch of geology dealing with the classification, correlation, and interpretation of stratified rocks) and so of other geology dependent natural sciences: “Sedimentary layers are deposited in a time sequence, with the oldest on the bottom and the youngest on the top.” Earth’s Four Spheres Atmosphere — A mix of mostly nitrogen and oxygen gas that surrounds Earth’s surface. It includes air, clouds, and precipitation. Biosphere – Includes life and all the places it can exist on, below and above Earth’s surface. Hydrosphere
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Study GuideTest1 - Pillow Basalts Sheeted Dikes GEOL 111 Mantle Gabbro Chapter 1(magma chamber Study Guide Test 1 Iron deposits in the great lakes

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