Linguistics Paper - The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis Briana...

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The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
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Briana Baillie May 2, 2011 Linguistics 102 Y. Ohara In linguistics, the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis states that there are certain thoughts of an individual in one language that cannot be understood by those who live in another language. It has caused controversy in many disciplines including linguistics, psychology, philosophy, anthropology, and education. It still has not been proven, but it has over the years intrigued many intellectuals. Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf conceptualized about the relationships between culture, language, and thought. Neither Sapir nor Whorf wrote the Hypothesis but from their work linguists have been able to create what is now known as the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis.
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Edward Sapir was an American anthropologist/linguist and a leader in American structural linguistics. Sapir studied the research of Wilhelm von Humboldt; Humboldt wrote in Gesammelte Werke : "Man lives in the world about him principally, indeed exclusively, as language presents it to him." (Humboldt) Sapir expanded on this idea, and although he did not always support the firm hypothesis, his writings state that there is a definite connection between language and thought. Sapir used firm language to describe this connection between language and thought. To Sapir, each person is unconscious to this connection but has no choice about it. Benjamin Lee Whorf was Sapir's student. Whorf has become associated with "the principle of linguistic relativity". Although he met and studied with Edward Sapir, he never took
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Linguistics Paper - The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis Briana...

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