L1 - L1Acquisition Language acquisition is the study of how...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    First-Language Acquisition
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    L1 Acquisition Language acquisition is the study of how human acquire a grammar: a set of semantic, syntactic, morphological, and phonological categories and rules that underlie their ability to speak and understand the language to which they are exposed.
Background image of page 2
    Learning—through conscious effort and instruction Acquiring—acquire ability to walk effortlessly and without instruction
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
      Mechanisms of language acquisition Through imitation? Reinforcement? Through analogy? Structured input?
Background image of page 4
    Prelinguistic stages In the first year, infants go through three stages of vocal production The crying stage --Birth-2 months, reflexive or involuntary sounds (burping, coughing, sighing, and sneezing) The cooing stage —2-5 months. Vowel like sounds. Hulit and Howard (2002) noted that cooing may be integrated into a simple Turn- taking routine. The cooing-imitation-cooing can last up to 15 minutes
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    The babbling stage —characterized by syllable-like consonant-vowel sounds. From 5, 6 months to 12 months. Reduplicative/syllabic babbling -repetition of a syllable ba-ba-ba Variegated babbling —little later, vary a consonant or vowel pa-ga-ba-ga, pu-pi-pa- pi Jargon babbling —later, characterized by prosodic or intonational patterns reminiscent of adult speech, what they say sounds like a question, making an announcement, etc.
Background image of page 6
    Protowords —a form does not correspond to an adult form but that is used consistently by a particular child for a particular referent or situation
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    At around six months, the infant begins to babble. The sounds produced in this period include many which do not occur in the language of the household. Gradually, the child’s babbles come to include only those sounds and sound combinations that occur in the target language.
Background image of page 8
    Linguistic stages General tendency: children go through  more or less the same stages at more  of less the same time
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Acquisition of phonology Vowels FIGURE10.1 The child’s first vowels (p.210) [-back] [+back] [ [+high]      i u [-high] a
Background image of page 10
    1. Extreme values before intermediate  values 2. They are common among the world’s  languages (/a/ is universal and /i, u/ are nearly  universal)
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course LING 102 taught by Professor Saft,s during the Spring '08 term at University of Hawaii - Hilo.

Page1 / 48

L1 - L1Acquisition Language acquisition is the study of how...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online