boron paper final

boron paper final - Boron on the Periodic Table of Elements...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Boron on the Periodic Table of Elements Piper Gunderson December 21, 2009 Mrs. Elliot
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Abstract The element Boron is one of the many elements on the Periodic Table of Elements. New things are being discovered about Boron every year, including structures, types, and properties. Boron is typically an overlooked element because it is next to the very popular Carbon element. However, Boron has some very interesting and distinguishing properties that are now just being discovered and evaluated. Gunderson 2
Background image of page 2
Boron There are one hundred and seventeen different elements in the Periodic Table of Elements. One of these elements is called Boron. Boron is one of the simplest of atoms and only hydrogen, helium, lithium and beryllium are considered simpler. Maybe Boron is repressed by its name because it sounds like the word boring; however, Boron remains an element of mysterious secrets. Boron is located in the Boron Family on the Periodic Table of Elements. The Boron Family is next to the Carbon Family and transition metals and is known specifically as group thirteen. Boron is also located in period two, across from Beryllium. Boron is in a very unique location because the transition metals come between Beryllium and itself. Boron is part of the metalloid series. The metalloid series refers to elements that have some of the properties of metals and some of the nonmetal properties. Metalloids tend to be semiconductors as well. Boron is also a nonmetal. Of the Boron Family, Boron is the only element that is a nonmetal. Nonmetals have different electro negativities conductivities when being compared to metals. Elements that are nonmetals tend to have very poor conduction and high electro negativity levels. Most of the time, non-metals are halogens and noble gasses. Only a few metalloids are also nonmetals. These include Silicon, Arsenic, Tellurium, and of course, Boron. The structure of Boron is different from other elements on the Periodic Table of Elements. Boron has an atomic radius of 1.17   Å or one tenth of a nanometer. The atomic radius is half the distance between two adjacent atoms in the crystal structure. A crystal structure is an Gunderson 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
atomic arrangement of the atoms of an element when it is in its solid state. The crystal structure of the element Boron is called a Rhombohedral. The electron configuration of boron is 1s 2 2s 2 2p. It has only three electrons to work with, so the ion is unpolarizable. For this reason, boron is not eager to give electrons and can also not easily accept them either. Therefore, the majority of Boron’s bonds share electrons, and form half-bonds where only one electron is shared covalently, not the usual two. This gives boron a valence level of positive six that is sometimes seen in some interesting compounds. The shell model of Boron is very interesting. This is because Boron has only three
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course BIO 1030 taught by Professor Bowl during the Spring '11 term at William & Mary.

Page1 / 10

boron paper final - Boron on the Periodic Table of Elements...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online