Carbon and Boron Families

Carbon and Boron Families - Carbon and Boron Families The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Carbon and Boron Families
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Carbon Family
Background image of page 2
Location of the Carbon Family on the Periodic Table of Elements 14th column over 14th column over
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Elements in the Carbon Family Carbon Silicon Germanium Tin Lead
Background image of page 4
Carbon The Basis of Life Found in all living material Atomic Number: 6 Atomic Weight: 12.0107 Density: 2.2670 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Silicon Semiconductor Used in computer chips and solar cells Second most abundant element in the earths crust Atomic Number: 14 Atomic Weight: 28.0855 Density: 2.3296 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal
Background image of page 6
Germanium Semiconductor Properties Used in the computer industry Doesn’t expand when frozen Atomic Number: 31 Atomic Weight: 69.723 Density: 5.91 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lead Used for plumbing Used to block radiation Atomic Number: 82 Atomic Weight: 207.2 Density: 11.342 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal
Background image of page 8
Tin Was used to make cans in the past Relatively stable – unreactive (aluminum has replaced some of the tin
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course BIO 1030 taught by Professor Bowl during the Spring '11 term at William & Mary.

Page1 / 23

Carbon and Boron Families - Carbon and Boron Families The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online