Chap17-Part1

Chap17-Part1 - Lewis Acids Lewis acids are defined as...

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Unformatted text preview: Lewis Acids Lewis acids are defined as electron-pair acceptors. Atoms with an empty valence orbital can be Lewis acids. 1 Lewis Bases Lewis bases are defined as electron-pair donors. Anything that could be a Brnsted-Lowry base is a Lewis base. Lewis bases can interact with things other than protons, however. 2 Figure 16.14-04UN Water Lewis Base CO 2 Lewis Acid 3 Hydrolysis of Metal Ions Fe 3+ + 6 [:CN:]- [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3- - Metals are positively charged and attract the unshared e- pairs -When they react with water, they share the e- pair of O atom: (Hydration process) - Metal acts as Lewis Acid and water acts as Lewis Base. Fe(H 2 O) 6 3+ (aq) [Fe(H 2 O) 5 (OH)] 2+ (aq) + H + (aq) 4 - Acid dissociation constant (K a ) for hydrolysis reaction increases with increasing charge and decreasing the radius of ion - Cu 2+ forms less acidic solutions than Fe 3+ A + and B + metals: Radius of B + is more than A + Solution of A is more acidic than solution of B A 2+ and B 3+ metals: Radius of A 2+ and B 3+ are almost same Solution of B is more acidic than solution of A 5 Chemistry 102: General Descriptive Chemistry II Brown, LeMay & Bursten (2006) Chemistry: The Central Science, 10 th Edition Chapter 17: Additional Aspects of Aqueous Equilibria Sections 17.1-17.6 We will not cover Section 17.7 Chapter 17 Homework Sections 17.1 to 17.6 Red concepts: 17.1, 17.3, 17.6 Red exercises: 17.11, 17.13, 17.15, 17.17, 17.19 17.21, 17.25, 17.31, 17.33, 17.35, 17.37, 17.43, 17.45, 17.47, 17.49, 17.53, 17.55, 17.57, 17.59, 17.65, 17.76, 17.78, 17.87 The Common Ion Effect The extent of ionization of a weak electrolyte is decrease by the addition of a strong electrolyte that has an ion in common with the weak electrolyte Consider a solution of acetic acid: If acetate ion is added to the solution, according to...
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Chap17-Part1 - Lewis Acids Lewis acids are defined as...

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