bornbully - Born to Be a Bully? Study shows social stress...

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Picture of Delville and hamser Dr. Yvon Delville's research with hamsters is providing answers to the source of aggressive behavior in humans. Born to Be a Bully? Study shows social stress can change your mind. Tacked up beside Yvon Delville's computer is a microphotograph of a stressed brain. Swollen clusters of black dots on the rumpled photocopy tell viewers all they need to know about nature versus nurture: your environment, literally, can change your mind. For the past decade Delville, a University of Texas at Austin psychology professor, has conducted research that yields intriguing insights into aggression, social stress and brain biochemistry during a child's development. Delville's research has evolved right alongside a spate of media-hyped acts of violence by teenagers over the past few years. Very curious about the brain mechanisms That control aggression and that may change because of exposure to threat and stress, Delville began to examine the effects of social stress and aggression on a rather late developmental period: adolescence. Because of their solitary and territorial predisposition, Delville selected golden hamsters as the animal model with which he would experiment. Hamsters are weaned at around 25 days of age, at which time the mother bumps them from the nest, and they venture out to live on their own. At this age they can be described as hamster teens.
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bornbully - Born to Be a Bully? Study shows social stress...

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